Knowledge Discovery in Databases with Diversity of Data Types

Knowledge Discovery in Databases with Diversity of Data Types

QingXiang Wu (University of Ulster at Magee, UK), Martin McGinnity (University of Ulster at Magee, UK), Girijesh Prasad (University of Ulster at Magee, UK) and David Bell (Queen’s University, UK)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 7
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-010-3.ch173
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Abstract

Data mining and knowledge discovery aim at finding useful information from typically massive collections of data, and then extracting useful knowledge from the information. To date a large number of approaches have been proposed to find useful information and discover useful knowledge; for example, decision trees, Bayesian belief networks, evidence theory, rough set theory, fuzzy set theory, kNN (k-nearest-neighborhood) classifier, neural networks, and support vector machines. However, these approaches are based on a specific data type. In the real world, an intelligent system often encounters mixed data types, incomplete information (missing values), and imprecise information (fuzzy conditions). In the UCI (University of California – Irvine) Machine Learning Repository, it can be seen that there are many real world data sets with missing values and mixed data types. It is a challenge to enable machine learning or data mining approaches to deal with mixed data types (Ching, 1995; Coppock, 2003) because there are difficulties in finding a measure of similarity between objects with mixed data type attributes. The problem with mixed data types is a long-standing issue faced in data mining. The emerging techniques targeted at this issue can be classified into three classes as follows: (1) Symbolic data mining approaches plus different discretizers (e.g., Dougherty et al., 1995; Wu, 1996; Kurgan et al., 2004; Diday, 2004; Darmont et al., 2006; Wu et al., 2007) for transformation from continuous data to symbolic data; (2) Numerical data mining approaches plus transformation from symbolic data to numerical data (e.g.,, Kasabov, 2003; Darmont et al., 2006; Hadzic et al., 2007); (3) Hybrid of symbolic data mining approaches and numerical data mining approaches (e.g.,, Tung, 2002; Kasabov, 2003; Leng et al., 2005; Wu et al., 2006). Since hybrid approaches have the potential to exploit the advantages from both symbolic data mining and numerical data mining approaches, this chapter, after discassing the merits and shortcomings of current approaches, focuses on applying Self-Organizing Computing Network Model to construct a hybrid system to solve the problems of knowledge discovery from databases with a diversity of data types. Future trends for data mining on mixed type data are then discussed. Finally a conclusion is presented.
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Introduction

Data mining and knowledge discovery aim at finding useful information from typically massive collections of data, and then extracting useful knowledge from the information. To date a large number of approaches have been proposed to find useful information and discover useful knowledge; for example, decision trees, Bayesian belief networks, evidence theory, rough set theory, fuzzy set theory, kNN (k-nearest-neighborhood) classifier, neural networks, and support vector machines. However, these approaches are based on a specific data type. In the real world, an intelligent system often encounters mixed data types, incomplete information (missing values), and imprecise information (fuzzy conditions). In the UCI (University of California – Irvine) Machine Learning Repository, it can be seen that there are many real world data sets with missing values and mixed data types. It is a challenge to enable machine learning or data mining approaches to deal with mixed data types (Ching, 1995; Coppock, 2003) because there are difficulties in finding a measure of similarity between objects with mixed data type attributes. The problem with mixed data types is a long-standing issue faced in data mining. The emerging techniques targeted at this issue can be classified into three classes as follows: (1) Symbolic data mining approaches plus different discretizers (e.g., Dougherty et al., 1995; Wu, 1996; Kurgan et al., 2004; Diday, 2004; Darmont et al., 2006; Wu et al., 2007) for transformation from continuous data to symbolic data; (2) Numerical data mining approaches plus transformation from symbolic data to numerical data (e.g.,, Kasabov, 2003; Darmont et al., 2006; Hadzic et al., 2007); (3) Hybrid of symbolic data mining approaches and numerical data mining approaches (e.g.,, Tung, 2002; Kasabov, 2003; Leng et al., 2005; Wu et al., 2006). Since hybrid approaches have the potential to exploit the advantages from both symbolic data mining and numerical data mining approaches, this chapter, after discassing the merits and shortcomings of current approaches, focuses on applying Self-Organizing Computing Network Model to construct a hybrid system to solve the problems of knowledge discovery from databases with a diversity of data types. Future trends for data mining on mixed type data are then discussed. Finally a conclusion is presented.

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