Knowledge Management Capability in Higher Education: The Case of Lecturers at Mzuzu University, Malawi

Knowledge Management Capability in Higher Education: The Case of Lecturers at Mzuzu University, Malawi

George Theodore Chipeta (Mzuzu University, Malawi) and Winner Dominic Chawinga (Mzuzu University, Malawi)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 32
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1741-2.ch015
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Abstract

For many years, universities have been accredited for being driving engines for the global economy by training experts in various fields of study such as Medicine, Education, Engineering, Mining, Technology, Military and Knowledge Management just to mention some of the most notable ones. Mzuzu University (MZUNI) which is one of the four public universities in Malawi is also involved in the production of knowledge through research and teaching activities by its lecturers. By self-administering a questionnaire to 130 lecturers at MZUNI, the authors investigated knowledge management practices by lecturers at MZUNI by addressing three objectives namely; types of knowledge created and acquired by lecturers, techniques of sharing and dissemination of knowledge and challenges faced. Results suggest that lecturers are involved in knowledge management practices although knowledge creation is mainly achieved through PhD and master's theses as part of their training as opposed to research outputs published in peer reviewed journals.
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Introduction

Universities have been accredited for being driving engines for the global economy. Universities have trained experts in various fields of study such as Medicine, Education, Engineering, Mining, Technology and Military just to mention some of the most notable ones. Aside training these experts, universities have remained and are expected to remain epicentres of research activities which have led to the production of valuable knowledge which is critical to the survival of public and private organisations and individuals in the torrid and rough global economy. Without the production of knowledge which is commonly created in universities, the corporate world is likely to collapse because researchers such as Zack (1999, p.45), Kulkarni and Freeze (2004, p.657) and Demchig (2015, p.3633) have argued that knowledge is an important strategic resource which creates and maintains a competitive advantage. Having been tasked with a huge responsibility of creating innovative knowledge and imparting tacit knowledge to students through teaching (see Juceviciene & Edintaite, 2012, p.555), one wonders how these universities have lived up to producing and sharing of the knowledge. Thus, in this study, we investigate how knowledge is created and managed at a public university environment in Malawi.

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