Leadership Shifts: Perceptions and Consequences, In-Person, or Cyber

Leadership Shifts: Perceptions and Consequences, In-Person, or Cyber

Sharon L. Burton (Florida Institute of Technology, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 27
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1049-9.ch028
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Abstract

This text examines the perception and consequences of new overall leaders whether in-person or cyber. First, the researcher presents fairness as a salient action by which followers, in-person or cyber, perceive leaders as working within the rules or standards for correct practice or conduits within a profession. Second, the researcher utilizes the fairness supposition to present leadership behaviors in that followers are generally willing to be led. Third, the researcher compares the fairness definition and supposition to a case study. Finally, the researcher presents how the values that brace leaders' fairness behaviors affect the behaviors of their followers and walk through behaviors and thoughts that may surface. The information will provide data that practitioners, and academes may employ in long and short term, in-person and cyber strategies.
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Background

In reviewing leaders’ fairness stances, this text will include how fairness was handled in automotive industry in the USA, as well as the pharmaceutical industry. Within the automotive industry, questionable fairness behaviors included excessive recalls, loss of lives to due mechanical failures, and in some cases knowing before that certain automobiles presented dangers before their release for sales (Loftus, 2015). A question to pose is how fair to employees and the general public was Volkswagen in its misrepresentation of emissions tests results for millions of vehicles worldwide (Hakim & Tabuchi, 2015). Also, this automotive company held a popularized reputation for not following automotive regulations and attempting to mislead regulators (Hakim & Tabuchi, 2015). Another fairness concern is the inequity of pay between men and women with equal credentials. The fairness issue is that these women, more often than not, are paid less than their male counterparts. Further, fairness concerns exist in how individuals’ information is being handled in cyberspace. According to Burton, Burrell, Bessette, McClintock, Brown-Jackson, and Lu (2015), strategic security is critical to the protection of sensitive information. The multiple breaches of data at governmental organizations, as well as retail facilities have the citizenry concerned as to whether senior leaders are behaving in a manner similar to the automotive industry in terms of what information is being shared with the public.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Fairness: A salient action by which followers, in-person or cyber, perceive leaders as working within the rules or standards for correct practice or conduits within a profession.

Servant-Leader: This term was coined by Robert K. Greenleaf. It refers to a leader who serves the people being led, as well as guide them.

Cyber: A symbol/image for defining a non-physical space created through computer systems.

Perception: The method or consequence of becoming cognizant of relationships, items, and events by the senses, which includes emotional intelligence, recognition, observation, and differentiation.

Leader: An individual who guides or commands a grouping of people.

Ethnocentric: A belief that one's own culture is superior to other cultures.

Strategic Leader: Leaders that streamline organizations and involve people.

Leadership: The ability to guide others toward a specific action that needs to be accomplished.

Fair: In harmony with the procedures or standards; genuine.

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