Learning From Failures

Learning From Failures

S.C. Lenny Koh (University of Sheffield, UK) and Stuart Maguire (University of Sheffield, UK)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-424-8.ch011
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Abstract

Strategic.failures can be defined as failures of achieving the expected benefits from the organizational, size and industrial sectors or countries’ perspectives at a higher level. At an organizational level, such failures could be related to a scenario where the ICT implementation has failed to enhance an enterprise’s image and recognition in the specific industry. From the angle of size and industrial sectors, such failures could be related to a phenomenon where ‘sectorial divide’ is apparent owing to the different stages of ICT adoption and hence affecting the possibility of integrating with suppliers and customers in a supply chain. Strategic failures can also be extended to failures at the countries level.
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To prevent failures, the scope of the project has to be manageable and projects need to be properly evaluated and reviewed (Maguire 2007).

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Strategic Failures

Introduction

Strategic failures can be defined as failures of achieving the expected benefits from the organizational, size and industrial sectors or countries’ perspectives at a higher level.

At an organizational level, such failures could be related to a scenario where the ICT implementation has failed to enhance an enterprise’s image and recognition in the specific industry. From the angle of size and industrial sectors, such failures could be related to a phenomenon where ‘sectorial divide’ is apparent owing to the different stages of ICT adoption and hence affecting the possibility of integrating with suppliers and customers in a supply chain. Strategic failures can also be extended to failures at the countries level.

It must be noted that ICT adoption and implementation go hand-in-hand in the sense that successful past implementation will increase adoption (Gunasekaran et al, 2006). Government policy plays a critical role in determining ICT growth, adoption and implementation for the country’s economy, the industry sectors and ultimately the enterprises.

Measuring information systems success and failure is a very complex process. Academics have attempted to identify the key criteria that affect the successful implementation of information systems for over 30 years (Lucas 1978). One recent research project used six key dimensions: system quality, information quality, service quality, use, user satisfaction, and net benefits (Petter et al. 2008).

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