Mentoring Pre-Service Teachers at a Historically Black University: Global Perspectives

Mentoring Pre-Service Teachers at a Historically Black University: Global Perspectives

Helen Brantley (Northern Illinois University, USA) and Cassandra Sligh Conway (South Carolina State University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6347-3.ch013
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Abstract

Mentoring relationships that can provide connections regionally and nationally are essential to prepare pre-service teachers (Crocito, Sullivan, & Carrabar, 2005). Moreover, a global perspective in mentoring pre-service teachers is needed in all teacher education programs to give pre-service teachers authentic application skills. The mentoring experiences provided in the chapter are based on experiences at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. These same mentoring experiences can occur at any type of university. These experiences are integral to enhance the understanding of preparing pre-service teachers in a global and ever changing society. The purpose of this chapter is as follows: 1) to provide a conceptual definition of mentoring; 2) to provide an example of a mentoring evaluation program; 3) to provide case examples of global and cultural mentoring experiences that impact pre-service teachers; 3) to provide examples of how educators can implement globalization activities in instructional materials; and 4) to provide an intellectual discussion of future strategies that impact practical and field experiences in teacher education programs.
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Introduction

It is important to indicate that recent research findings (DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, & Cooper, 2002) indicated many instances where teachers, guidance counselors, mentors, and coaches must receive professional development activities, as well as provide opportunities to develop programs in their classes, schools and through university partnerships geared to immediately aid pre-service teachers’ needs in the area of mentoring. The multiplicity of mentoring activities can improve a variety of outcomes at all levels (Lawner, Beltz & Moore, 2013).

Equally important in mentoring is increasing globalization in mentoring relationships that can enhance mentoring connections regionally and nationally (Crocito, Sullivan, & Carrabar, 2005). Moreover, a global perspective in mentoring pre-service teachers is needed in all teacher education programs to give pre-service teachers authentic application skills. The purpose of this chapter is threefold: 1) to provide a conceptual definition of mentoring; 2) to provide an example of a mentoring evaluation program; 3) to provide case examples of global and cultural mentoring experiences that impact pre-service teachers; 3) to provide examples of how educators can implement globalization activities in instructional materials; and 4) and to provide an intellectual discussion of future strategies that impact practical and field experiences in teacher education programs.

Definition of Mentoring

Parslow and Wray (2000) define the mentor as a person who is “orientated towards an exchange of wisdom, support, learning or guidance for the purpose of personal, spiritual, career, or life growth”… p. 12). The primary aim or objective in a mentoring relationship is to promote growth in the mentee (the one being mentored). In today’s society, there are many needs for higher education institutions and other public and private organizations to use mentoring as a global intervention to reach pre-service teachers. According to Elite Women (2010), “mentoring is so much more than teaching. It’s an invested interest in another’s success, and an eager pupil ready to take it all in. Mentoring is sharing your successes as well as failures; we learn by example. A mentor is an exemplary that sets a velocity for others to follow” (p.1).

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Global Approaches In Mentoring

It is necessary to create a mentoring and cultural embedded program using a global approach because of the era of academic accountability and change in the college population. The Longview Foundation Report (2004-2014) noted that the global economy has changed the face of teachers today. This report noted that pre-service teachers might be students from diverse backgrounds. These students are older, commute, have families, work full-time. They come from all over the universe. The Longview Foundation report noted, “Today’s student will need extensive knowledge of the world and the skills and dispositions to engage people from many cultures and countries. They will need to be responsible citizens and effective participants in the global market of the 21st century,” (p. 3). To address the areas noted in this report, it may be wise to have a global mentoring program to enhance the academic success and retention rate of pre-service teachers who are from diverse backgrounds. Moreover, providing global mentoring experiences will provide pre-service teachers with experiences that will prepare them to work with students from different backgrounds. Therefore, the mentoring process has a universal effect for the pre-service teacher, the student, and the university preparing the pre-service teacher.

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