A Model to Measure E-Learning Systems Success

A Model to Measure E-Learning Systems Success

Ahmed Younis Alsabawy (University of Southern Queensland, Australia), Aileen Cater-Steel (University of Southern Queensland, Australia) and Jeffrey Soar (University of Southern Queensland, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0170-3.ch015
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

E-learning involves adopting and exploiting the potential of new, advanced Information Technology in development and delivery of education. In spite of a rapid growth in the e-learning field there still exists a range of issues facing the stakeholders of e-learning systems. One of the key issues is how to measure e-learning system success. Although considerable attention has been paid to the Information Systems success issue, there remain arguments about the factors which are most effective for measuring Information System success. The issue of measuring Information System success has an impact on evaluating e-learning systems success. This chapter aims to fill this void by proposing an evaluation methodology model to assess e-learning systems success. The contribution of this study is the proposed model to evaluate the success of e-learning systems. The model is based on a thorough review of the e-learning success literature and existing Information Systems success models.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

Information technology (IT) has become an essential factor in organisational success due to the critical role of IT in enabling the achievement of individual and organisational goals. The introduction of IT is no longer limited to back-office business functions but has grown to include the core processes in health, education, transport, banking, and other fields. The advantages, which are generated by using technologies such as internet, hardware, and software, have pushed organisations to employ IT to facilitate more and more of their activities. Shannak (1999) argues that performance of primary and supportive activities is considered impracticable in organisations without information technology. In addition, impacts of using IT are extended to include the macro economy of different countries. Doig (2002) states that “the information revolution is sweeping through our economy. No company can escape its effects” (p. 1).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset