Natural Rubber and Rubber Blend Nanocomposites: Reinforcement of Natural Rubber with Polymer-Encapsulated Inorganic Nanohybrid Particles

Natural Rubber and Rubber Blend Nanocomposites: Reinforcement of Natural Rubber with Polymer-Encapsulated Inorganic Nanohybrid Particles

Anyaporn Boonmahitthisud (Chulalongkorn University, Thailand)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 29
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1971-3.ch004
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Natural rubber (NR) is representative biomass polymer and the effective uses are strongly contributed to sustainable society. This chapter presents the innovative and advanced rubber nanocomposites with polystyrene-encapsulated silica nanohybrids (PS-nSiO2) subsequently used as a nanofiller for NR and NR/styrene butadiene rubber (NR/SBR). The PS-nSiO2 were prepared via ‘in situ' differential microemulsion polymerization. The core-shell nanohybrids of PS-nSiO2 were achieved with an average diameter of 40 nm using a smaller amount of surfactant, compared to microemulsion polymerization method. Moreover, the effects of the NR and NR/SBR filled with PS-nSiO2 nanohybrids on the mechanical properties, thermal stability, flammability and morphology are also discussed. The results indicated that the encapsulation of nSiO2 with PS can provide not only the well-dispersion of nanoparticles in the rubber matrix but also the synergistic properties of two components from the polymer and the inorganic nanoparticles by improving mechanical properties, thermal stability and flammability of rubber nanocomposites.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

The rapidly increasing human population growth caused an increasing demand on the limited resources of petroleum. While the demand for world crude oil is growing at 2 percentages each year, the volume of a newly discovered oil has decreased dramatically every five years since the early 2000s (Figure 1). This has caused the impending world oil shortage and facing the rising oil price (Lindgren, 2003). Currently, the environmental sustainability issues have received considerable attention in the scientific world. Utilization of bio-based resources including trees (Nair & Joseph, 2014), food crops (Chumeka, Pasetto, Pilard, & Tanrattanakul, 2014), shells of animals (Shahzadi et al., 2016), algae and agricultural byproducts (Noreen, Zia, Zuber, Ali, & Mujahid) is becoming an attractive alternative resource for the production of new materials because they can be naturally replenished themselves over short periods of time, which means they will never run out.

Figure 1.

The volume of oil discovered worldwide during 1940-2000

Source: Lindgren, 2003

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset