Observations From Word Roots About the Nature of Human Knowledge

Observations From Word Roots About the Nature of Human Knowledge

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-8079-9.ch004

Abstract

Based on the types of divine process control flow discussed in Chapter 3, the authors examine the Arabic word roots of the first chapter of the Quran which is called Al-Fatiha (introduction). These word roots deal with the nature of divine and human knowledge.
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Introduction

Our speculations about the meanings of the sounds are entirely based on the Arabic text of the Quran (Al-Qur’an, 1992; Adi, 2007). This text of Divine revelation was recorded by multiple scribes during the lifetime of the messenger Muhammad to whom this text was revealed by the Archangel Gabriel. Therefore, the Arabic text of the Quran is considered the exact words of God without any alteration. No other holy book makes such a claim. The scholars of Christianity and Judaism make no such claims of perfect authenticity about any part of the Bible.

“Quran” means “lectures.” A chapter of the Quran is called a “surah” (a complete lecture). The first surah of the Quran is called “Al-Fatiha” (the introduction to the Quran).

We have discussed the meanings of sounds in Chapter 1 and Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, we outlined the types of Divine process control flowcharts that are represented by word roots through the meanings of their sounds. In this chapter, we will examine the word roots of Al-Fatiha with special focus on word roots that deal with the nature of Divine and human knowledge.

We will also examine related word roots from other parts of the Quran.

Over the months we have spent writing this book, fleeting Divine inspirations allowed us to speculate about these flowcharts.

In Figure 1, Figure 2, and Figure 3, we have organized all the meanings of Divine general process types and Divine general process modes that we encountered during the writing of this whole book. Figure 1 and Figure 2 list the meanings indicated by Divine inspirations that we received regarding general process types. Figure 3 lists the meanings indicated by Divine inspiration that we received regarding general process modes.

We will start with these overview figures for the sake of clarity. These figures will be gradually explained as we proceed through this chapter and the rest of the book. These figures are a basic reference for the whole book.

Figure 1.

Meanings of Divine general process types, part A

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Figure 2.

Meanings of Divine general process types, part B

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Figure 3.

Meanings of Divine general process modes

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Figure 1 and Figure 2 are organized by the row headers of Figure 1 of Chapter 3. Figure 3 is organized by the column headers of Figure 1 of Chapter 3.

In Figure 1 and Figure 2, abbreviated process types (Contain, Manifest, Assign, and their combinations) are named next to applicable process shapes as section titles (e.g., Contain next to the ovals). Latin equivalents of Arabic sounds follow the section titles in parentheses, e.g., Contain (OQNG). Related meanings are grouped together under a group of meanings in bold type, e.g., collect (capture, data, …) under the section title Contain. The group members follow in parentheses. Figure 3 simply lists the meanings encountered in this book of each Divine general process mode.

This paragraph explains the general rules of italics and underlines both in the figures and the text that explains the figures. Divine general process modes and their meanings will be in italic font, and Divine general process types and their meanings will be underlined. The transliteration of Arabic words will be in italic font, with word root sounds in uppercase.

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