Organization Elements and Supports for Outstanding Retention and Student Success Coaching

Organization Elements and Supports for Outstanding Retention and Student Success Coaching

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-5948-1.ch004

Abstract

Using data gathered from interviews, coaching center observations, a document review, and four focus groups of elite coaches, this chapter assess the organizational resources and supports necessary to support consistently outstanding retention and student success coaching. The organizational elements of the study are arranged and discussed using five themes that are discussed and interwoven throughout the chapter. Theme one is the socio-cultural elements of the organization. This theme looks at coach interactions, the mood and atmosphere of the workplace, mentoring and role modeling. Theme two looks at the elements of highly functional teams using the five-part Lencioni framework of trust, conflict resolution, results, accountability, and commitment. The third organizational assessment is built around the alignment of coaching services and organization supports. The fourth theme explores the coaches' expectations of management, as well as organizational resources and performance incentives. The final theme of the chapter looks at overall organizational performance and provides recommendations for optimizing coaching environments for consistency and success.
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Organizational Element Of The Study

The organizational element of the study explores the structures and supports within and around the coaching organization that enhance the coaches’ knowledge and motivation to succeed with their students and as a coaching team (Clark & Estes, 2008; Lencioni, 2002; Rueda, 2011; Schein, 2004). The organizational component of the study also explores Lencioni (2002) and Schein’s (2004) theories that high levels of trust and open communication within an organization are key indicators of high functioning organizations and successful teams. The study also sought to understand how high levels of trust and strong communication between the coaches and their students impacted or improved course and program retention rates. As such, the elements of trust and open communication were central to the study of professional coaching services.

The organizational elements of the study are arranged and discussed using five themes that are discussed and interwoven throughout the chapter. Theme one explores the socio-cultural elements of the organization. This theme looks at coach interactions, the mood and atmosphere of the workplace, mentoring and role modeling. Theme two looks at the elements of highly functional teams using the five-part Lencioni framework of trust, conflict resolution, results, accountability and commitment and also incorporates some of Schein’s theories of organizational roles. The third organizational assessment element is built around the alignment of coaching services and organization supports that clearly inform a singular and clear focus for the entire organization. The fourth theme explores the coaches’ expectations of management, as well as organizational resources and performance incentives. The final theme of the chapter looks at overall organizational performance and provides recommendations for optimizing coaching environments for consistency and success.

Assumed Organizational Assets

The study utilized a layered combination framework to apply the work of Gallimore and Goldenberg (2001), Lencioni (2002) and Schein (2004) to explore the cultural models and cultural settings of InsideTrack. Key organization assumptions included that there is an effective socialization process that optimizes the cultural structures and supports of the organization and that InsideTrack actively uses role models, peer-to-peer models, and best practices to create positive and supportive cultural settings. These elements contribute to a “climate of respect” where an optimized learning atmosphere and intrinsic motivation are likely to emerge (Wlodkowski, 2008, p. 161). Another assumption central to the organizational component of the study was that the coaching organization used effective incentives tailored to the coaches in order to achieve high performance. Finally, it was assumed that evidence of a clear organizational alignment between priorities, procedures, and rewards achieved could be observed (Gallimore & Goldberg, 2001; Lencioni, 2002; Rueda, 2011; Schein, 2004; Wlodkowski, 2008). It is generally assumed that “when multiple goals are aligned and not in conflict, they are likely to lead to more adaptive behavior” (Rueda, 2011, p. 44).

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