A Path Analysis of the Impact of Application-Specific Perceptions of Computer Self-Efficacy and Anxiety on Technology Acceptance

A Path Analysis of the Impact of Application-Specific Perceptions of Computer Self-Efficacy and Anxiety on Technology Acceptance

Bassam Hasan (The University of Toledo, USA) and Mesbah U. Ahmed (The University of Toledo, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0140-6.ch017
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Abstract

Perceptions of computer self-efficacy (CSE) and computer anxiety are valuable predictors of various computer-related behaviors, including acceptance and utilization of information systems (IS). Although both factors are purported to have general and application-specific components, little research has focused on the application or system-specific component, especially in IS acceptance contexts. Thus, little is known about the effects of application-specific beliefs on IS acceptance or how such effects compare with the effects of more general CSE and computer anxiety beliefs. Accordingly, a research model comprising application CSE, application anxiety, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, attitude, and intention was proposed and tested via path analysis. The results demonstrated that the direct impacts of application CSE and application anxiety on perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were almost equal, but in opposite directions. However, the indirect effect of application CSE on attitude and intention was stronger than that of application anxiety.
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Research Background And Hypotheses

The technology acceptance model (TAM) (Davis, 1989; Davis et al., 1989) provides a theoretical basis for studying IS acceptance. TAM models IS acceptance and use as a function of users’ beliefs about perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of the target system. Reviews and meta-analytic studies of TAM provide ample support for TAM’s ability to explain and predict technology acceptance and utilization (King & He, 2006; Legris et al., 2003; Ma & Liu, 2004; Mahmood et al., 2001). Although TAM captures the impact of external factors on IS acceptance through their direct effects on perceptions of ease of use and usefulness (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw, 1989), external factors effecting TAM have not been adequately examined in past research (Hsu & Lu, 2004; Taylor & Todd, 1995). As was pointed out earlier, the literature indicates that additional research is needed to investigate which and how external variables influence TAM’s core variables and subsequent acceptance behavior (Lee et al., 2003).

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