Pedagogical Cases in Integrating Technology Into Instruction: What Can We Do to Celebrate Failure?

Pedagogical Cases in Integrating Technology Into Instruction: What Can We Do to Celebrate Failure?

Jackie HeeYoung Kim (Georgia Southern University, USA) and Lucas John Jensen (Georgia Southern University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-9232-7.ch009

Abstract

This chapter will showcase two practitioners' experiences in using technology tools to promote student engagement in learning in high school and college classroom contexts. A review of the characteristics of technology tools used and the suitable theoretical background of the use of their chosen technology tools will be presented respectively. This is followed by an overview of two failed instructional experimentations to integrate technology tools into existing teaching formats. The chapter will present a series of reflections on the suitability of educational incentives that technology can offer and provide some pedagogical insight for teachers who are thinking of using technology tools as a means to support student learning. This chapter will contribute to conducting successful research and development that can advance the effective use of technology to support teaching and learning.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

Researchers have asserted that problems associated with technology integration may have much less to do with access and technical mastery of technology and much more to do with effective use in practice (Al-Awidi & Alghazo, 2012; Jenkins et al., 2006). Understanding appropriate pedagogical practices for using technology can be more important to effective instruction than technical mastery of technology, although both elements are essential. As instructors and educators, we often encounter emerging innovations, but we have little evidence that integrating innovative technology tools in learning is more effective than not employing technology tools. Often, a positive vision and promising technology features–without careful consideration of course design and student learning–have led to failed pedagogical experiments, which, in turn, discourage educators from adopting new technology tools in their classroom instruction. Although much research seeks to promote the positive elements of technology adoption in educational contexts, educators should be wary of possible negative consequences when the integration of technology into an existing teaching context is poorly designed and supported. Failed integration experiences can, however, provide invaluable lessons that might lead to a better understanding of innovative technology ideas and impact factors that will hopefully prevent future failed technology integration in the classroom.

This paper will showcase two practitioners’ failed experiences in using innovative technology tools to promote student engagement, in both the high school and college classroom contexts. A review of the characteristics of technology tools used and the suitable theoretical background of the use of their chosen technology tools will be presented. This will be followed by an overview of two failed instructional experiments to integrate technology tools into existing teaching contexts. The paper will present reflections on the suitability of educational incentives that technology can offer and will provide some pedagogical insight for teachers who are thinking of using technology tools as a mean0s to support student learning and engagement.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Learning Management System: A piece of software used to deliver and manage online educational content, including discussion forums, tests, and grades.

Online Discussion Forum: An online hub, called a “forum,” where users post messages to hold a discussion around a given topic. In educational contexts, online discussion forums are typically housed within a learning management system.

Hashtag: A metadata tag preceded by a pound sign (#) that is placed in social media posts to group together disparate posts under a common theme.

Twitter: An online social network where users post “tweets,” short messages initially limited to 140 characters and since expanded to 280 characters. Twitter users can reply to others’ tweets or “retweet” them, sharing them to their own page.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset