My Personal Mobile Language Learning Environment: An Exploration and Classification of Language Learning Possibilities Using the iPhone

My Personal Mobile Language Learning Environment: An Exploration and Classification of Language Learning Possibilities Using the iPhone

Maria A. Perifanou (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-2467-2.ch017
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Abstract

Mobile devices can motivate learners through moving language learning from predominantly classroom–based contexts into contexts that are free from time and space. The increasing development of new applications can offer valuable support to the language learning process and can provide a basis for a new self regulated and personal approach to learning. A key challenge for language teachers is to actively explore the potential of mobile technologies in their own learning so that they can support students in using them. The aim of this paper is first to describe the basic theoretical framework of Mobile Learning and Personal Learning Environments. Secondly, it intends to assist language teachers and learners in building their own Mobile Personal Learning Environment providing a useful classification of iPhone applications with a description and examples. The paper concludes with the proposal of ideas for practical, personal language learning scenarios, piloted in an Italian language learning context.
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Open Education And Personal Learning Environments

Have new technological developments paved the way for a new more open and democratic in education and is this a new development? The vision of an open educational system was expressed many years ago by Piaget, Illich (1970) and Freire (1970) who have contributed their voices in a call to make education more equitable, more accessible, and more reflective of the nature of learning. Other researchers and educationalists have argued for reform in the balance of power between teachers and learners. Papert and Harel (1991) suggested that learning requires active doing and not lecture-based telling, while Vygotsky (1978) and Wenger (1998) emphasized the importance of social, culture, community, and history for learning.

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