Personality, Internet Addiction, and Other Technological Addictions: A Psychological Examination of Personality Traits and Technological Addictions

Personality, Internet Addiction, and Other Technological Addictions: A Psychological Examination of Personality Traits and Technological Addictions

Zaheer Hussain (University of Derby, UK) and Halley M. Pontes (Nottingham Trent University, UK)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 27
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-3477-8.ch003

Abstract

Research into technological addictions, such as Internet addiction, smartphone addiction and social networking addiction has greatly increased. It is important to understand how technological addictions may be related to different personality types and key individual differences associated to personality. This chapter provides empirical and conceptual insights into how technological addictions may be related to different personality types and key individual differences associated to personality. This chapter focuses on a number of technological addictions and illustrates how research and theory in this area has developed in relation to commonly researched personality traits (e.g., extraversion, introversion, neuroticism, conscientiousness, openness to experience, and narcissism) and key individual differences related to personality (e.g., personality disorders). The complex nature of personality and technological addictions is discussed together with areas for future research.
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Introduction

Recent figures suggest that 40% of the world’s population have access to the Internet, worldwide Internet usage has increased with 499 million Internet users in Europe, 647 million users in the Americas, 240 million users in Africa and 1.7 billion users in Asia and the Pacific region (International Telecommunication Union [ITU], 2016). When considering country specific data, 74% of individuals use the Internet in the United States of America (USA), 91% in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), 93% in Japan and 89% in South Korea (ITU, 2016). Although Internet use is usually beneficial and advantageous for most people (Howard, Wilding & Guest, 2016; Heo et al. 2015; Roy & Ferguson, 2016; Wiederhold, 2017), increased availability and high penetration rates across the globe can facilitate the emergence of excessive and addictive behaviors related to Internet use. Furthermore, many people appear to display impulsive, narcissistic and aggressive personalities online which can be nurtured by various Internet technologies (Aboujaoude, 2017).

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