Professional Development for Teaching College Mathematics Using an Integrated Flipped Classroom

Professional Development for Teaching College Mathematics Using an Integrated Flipped Classroom

Lori Ogden (West Virginia University, USA) and Neal Shambaugh (West Virginia University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-3873-8.ch009
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Abstract

Any innovative approach to teaching benefits from systematic study on its use augmented by professional development, which serves to sustain the innovation over time for individual use and across an academic program. Ongoing study of using a flipped classroom for mathematics teaching used design and development research (Richey & Klein, 2005) across multiple cases of teaching college algebra (Ogden & Shambaugh, 2016) and subsequent application in other mathematics courses. The chapter summarizes the development of an integrated teaching model for the flipped classroom, a model situated within the strategic plan of an undergraduate mathematics program. The chapter then outlines professional development on using the flipped college classroom for mathematics courses with a face-to-face event and online supporting activities, which serve to sustain and build on learning outcomes for implementation of this teaching innovation.
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Extending An Innovation To Professional Development

Viewing pedagogical innovations as developmental, we suggest that teaching be systematically studied and accompanied by a professional development plan to ensure responsiveness to student and faculty needs, and appropriate use of resources. This chapter extends our work on the systematic study of a flipped classroom approach for the teaching of college algebra (Ogden, Pyzdrowski, & Shambaugh, 2014; Ogden & Shambaugh, 2016, 2017) and how features of the flipped approach have been used in other college mathematics courses. We have field-tested a teaching model for the implementation of the flipped classroom and documented its features using Joyce and Weil’s conceptual approach for Models of Teaching (Joyce, Weil, & Calhoun, 2014).

Section one summarizes the development of an integrated teaching model situated within the context of an undergraduate mathematics program. The idea of an “integrated flipped classroom” extends the scope of teaching decisions based on the goals of a mathematics program. Section two provides professional development (PD) guidelines for implementing the model taking into account the different needs of tenure-track, tenured faculty, teaching faculty and adjuncts. PD activities are organized by a F2F event and follow-up online activities that serve to sustain the implementation of the flipped approach. Both activities keep program outcomes a priority as faculty explore student differences, mathematical content, and the pragmatic challenges of implementing a flipped classroom with video and classroom activities.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Screencasts: The digital recording of any activity taking place on the computer screen.

Blended Learning Environment: A learning environment that utilizes both online and face-to-face learning activities.

Cooperative Learning Activities: Activities designed to promote student collaboration to reach a common goal.

Nurturant Effects: Indirect effects of the teaching model or effects that result from experiencing the learning environment established from use of the model.

Active Learning: Learning that involves active student participation in classroom activities.

Instructional Effects: Direct effects of the teaching model or effects that result from the content taught using the model.

Inverted Classroom: A synonym for flipped classroom.

E-Learning: Learning that involves student use of electronic and often online resources.

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