Properties of Knowledge Matter: A Re-Examination of the Glitz of Entrepreneurialism as a Change Paradigm for Higher Education

Properties of Knowledge Matter: A Re-Examination of the Glitz of Entrepreneurialism as a Change Paradigm for Higher Education

Mary A. Burston (La Trobe University, Australia)
Copyright: © 2015 |Pages: 17
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8468-3.ch012
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

In this theoretical chapter, the concept of fungibility is deployed as an analytical device for re-examining assumptions made about the capacities of entrepreneurialism to transform higher education, learning, and curricula. The purpose is to demonstrate that properties of knowledge matter when it comes to presumptions, policy directives, and promises made about academic and institutional agency and participation in the knowledge economy. From the perspective that not all knowledge is equal in value, the chapter highlights a core conceptual problem underpinning the reform agenda of entrepreneurialism in concluding that properties of knowledge matter for democratic participation in the knowledge economy.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

Universities have increasingly been brought into the center of economic, political and national discourse within the past thirty years as new modes of educational agency are advanced in the twenty-first century “knowledge” economy. The shifting of roles and institutional purposes – previously held to as domains of academic and disciplinary inquiry into knowledge - seeks to configure a new paradigm in which economic market principles and theories underpin the conceptual, institutional and cultural architecture of the “entrepreneurial” university (Rosenberg, 2003, pp. 113-140; Thorp & Goldstein, 2010). While some welcome this emerging schema as a necessity for renewing and refocusing the purpose and role of universities in contemporary society, others consider the damaging effects of unilateral compliance to economic imperatives and the impact on institutional cultures of collegiality, values and academic practices (Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004; Lambert, Parker & Neary, 2007; Braunerhjelm & Henrekson, 2013). Under the rubric of entrepreneurialism, new forms of institutional agency and identity are being shaped in characterizations of innovation, creativity, adventurism, opportunism and self-autonomy in promoting aspirations of institutional mobility and strengthened associations between higher education and capitalization of knowledge (Laredo, 2007; Bonaccorsi & Daraio, 2007).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset