Relational Body Identities: Body Image Control Through Self-Portraits – A Revision of the Body Image Control in Photos Questionnaire

Relational Body Identities: Body Image Control Through Self-Portraits – A Revision of the Body Image Control in Photos Questionnaire

Valentina Boursier (University of Naples Federico II, Italy) and Valentina Manna (Association for Social Promotion Roots in Action, Italy)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-4047-2.ch003

Abstract

Self-portrayal is one of the most popular online activities, especially among adolescents and young adults. The selfie-craze explosion through photo-sharing represent a new task for adolescents' researchers, but few instruments explore how adolescents can control their body image through self-portraits. One of these is the body image control in photos questionnaire. The aim of this chapter is to develop and validate a revised short version of the BICPQ, administered to 1220 Italian adolescents. The establishment of a cut-off procedure is proposed for screening purposes to identify at-risk and problematic users. Moreover, differences by gender and age are explored and discussed.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

The identity construction is a personal and psychological process that involves body indwelling and, profoundly, the connection with primary emotional and relational experiences. At the same time, it represents a public process involving both the individual ‘‘identity announcement” and the ‘‘identity placement” provided by the others, who endorse the claimed identity (Stone, 1981). Certainly, the identity construction and the new body integration represent phase-specific developmental tasks during the adolescence (Zhao, Grasmuck, & Martin, 2008). On one hand, body transformations require such a kind of process; on the other hand, the experience of who I am is deeply related to the way I look and to the group I belong to, as they suggest what the other see and reflect about me. As a result, one’s own body image is strongly influenced by self-esteem and self-evaluation, and strictly linked to the evaluation provided by the others. Moreover, it can be powerfully affected by cultural messages and societal/media standards of appearance and attractiveness. For this reason, research investigating the process of identity construction in adolescence is increasingly exploring the Internet environment (Pelosi, Zorzi & Corsano, 2014), which constitutes a key context for interpersonal relationships and self-presentation.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset