Relationship Marketing Through Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

Relationship Marketing Through Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality

Anjali Daisy (SASTRA University (Deemed), India)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-2874-7.ch001
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Abstract

Augmented reality (AR) refers to the layering of visual information onto a live picture of your physical surroundings, enhancing the real-world environment in real-time. Both Snapchat and Instagram filters are current examples of augmented reality. Since this technology has shown its ability to catch users, more and more brands are using it to engage current and potential customers. In an environment where almost everyone has a Smartphone, augmented reality seems like an obvious next step since there is no need for the additional hardware. It is generally quite straightforward for people to use, and has a great capacity to enhance the effects of marketing.
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Introduction

Conceptualization of Virtual Reality

VR refers to an artificial, computer-generated environment that uses high-end graphics, as well as audio and aural sensations, to make users feel as if they are in a real-world where they can interact with – and sometimes manipulate – what’s around them. Most VR experiences are generated through the use of specialized headsets that fully immerse a person in the virtual world. Although the use of VR in digital marketing has not yet gone mainstream, some brands are experimenting with this technology to create more personalized and engaging experiences for their customers.

If you’re intrigued by the possibilities of VR but are unsure how to shape it to the unique needs of your company, here are some brand examples. The New York Times began a virtual storytelling campaign in which they delivered Google Cardboard glasses to their subscribers in order to watch a VR film. This was excellent digital marketing- this experience provided viewers the emotional intensity that has reinforced brand loyalty and gave a chance of experiencing a story instead of just reading it.

Conceptualization of Augmented Reality

Augmented reality (AR) refers to the layering of visual information onto a live picture of your physical surroundings, enhancing the real-world environment in real-time Both Snap chat and Instagram filters are current examples of augmented reality. Since this technology has shown its ability to catch users, more and more brands are making use of it to engage current and potential customers. In an environment where almost everyone has a Smartphone, augmented reality seems like an obvious next step since there is no need for the additional hardware it is generally quite straightforward for people to use, and has a great capacity to enhance the effects of marketing.

Taken these two conceptualizations the current chapter aims to give an overview of how VR and AR has been employed in marketing context.

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Background

Difference Between Augmented And Virtual Reality

For the uninitiated, the line between VR and AR may be blurred. Virtual Reality is a computer-generated, fully immersive experience in which an artificial, 3D environment is simulated and can be interacted as it were real. From piloting an aircraft to setting foot on Mars, VR creates the illusion of the impossible from your home.

Augmented Reality is a view of our current world with computer-generated graphics superimposed over it, creating an interaction between the real-world and virtual information. The most popular example of AR so far has been Pokémon Go, a pop culture phenomenon that took advantage of blending nostalgia with new and novel technologies.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Virtual Reality: Simulating the real world using high-performance computers and sensory equipment, like headsets and gloves.

Relationship Marketing: A component of customer relationship management (CRM) that focuses on log-term relationships between the firm and other stakeholders (mainly customers).

Augmented Reality: Interactive experience of a real-world environment where the objects presents in the real world are enhanced by computer-generated perceptual information.

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