Retrospection of a Maori Tutor Educator's Bi-Cultural Teaching Discourse in Te Wananga o Aotearoa (TWoA): A Narrative Portfolio

Retrospection of a Maori Tutor Educator's Bi-Cultural Teaching Discourse in Te Wananga o Aotearoa (TWoA): A Narrative Portfolio

Terehia Ratima (Independent Researcher, New Zealand)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-6061-6.ch008

Abstract

This chapter attempts to explore the possibility of the application of Ako Wananga ontological discourse from the bi-cultural framework teaching perspective within Te Wananga o Aotearoa in Aotearoa New Zealand incorporating Te Tiriti o Waitangi/The Treaty of Waitangi as a partnership agreement between Mᾱori and non-Mᾱori. The author's teaching philosophy roots in the belief that effective learning can take place in a safe environment where the Kaiako (educator) and the tauira (student) are enabled to build a relationship that is meaningful.
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Design/Approach

My teaching philosophy roots in my belief that effective learning can take place in a safe environment where the Kaiako (educator) and the tauira (student) are enabled to build a relationship that is meaningful. Why is this so important to me? To help you to understand I will need to go back to when I first entered the tertiary environment.

Findings

This article reports on a narrative portfolio self-study research into my negotiations as a Mᾱori Kaiako (educator) within the bicultural teaching framework in Te Wananga o Aotearoa in New Zealand. This can be an informative research experience towards alternative bi-cultural teaching.

Originality/Value

This personal journey in teaching the bicultural aspect of ‘Ako’ (Mᾱori pedagogy) namely; Whanaungatanga (relationship building) is a framework in which I have grown up with. This framework has many different facets some of these being; Tuakana/Teina (older/younger sibling support), Manaaki (caring and sharing), Kaitiaki (nurture and mentor) and Koha (contributions).

Furthermore, this method of teaching and learning aligns with a student-centred approach whereby the students’ contributions are of extreme importance and are highly valued. This for me far outweighs the traditional approach of the teacher-centred method.

Research Limitations

This article is a self-reflective narrative portfolio of my teaching experience using a Mᾱori Kaupapa model of teaching practice within the classroom. The interpretation of the essence of Whanaungatanga as an effective teaching tool.

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Reflective Practice

When it comes to a caring and inclusive learning environment, I as an educator have a responsibility and an obligation to take an active role in my own learning. This can be achieved through ongoing reflective practice to enhance and develop my understanding of concerns, and how to address these, are what educators face, on a daily basis.

Osterman and Kottkamp (2014) defined reflective practice as a means by which educators can develop a greater level of self-awareness about the nature and effect of their performance, an awareness that generates opportunities for professional growth and development.

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