Screencasting for Mathematics Online Learning: A Case Study of a First Year Operations Research Course at a Dual Delivery Mode Australian University

Screencasting for Mathematics Online Learning: A Case Study of a First Year Operations Research Course at a Dual Delivery Mode Australian University

Birgit Loch (Swinburne University of Technology, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60960-875-0.ch003

Abstract

This chapter presents a case study of technology integration to support student learning in a first year operations research course at a dual delivery mode university. The course is taken by on-campus and distance students at the same time. It is shown how both groups are treated the same in this course in terms of provision of course material, access to the course learning management system, and to screencasts of live classes and additional explanations. The only difference between the two groups is the on-campus students’ ability to attend live face-to-face classes and to interact with the lecturer. The chapter demonstrates how screencasting is used effectively in online learning. Its objective is to share good practice of technology enhanced learning.
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Background

Traditionally, the lecture model is the most commonly used teaching approach in universities, and this is particularly true in the mathematical sciences. Most current mathematics lecturers would have studied mathematics through face to face lectures and this model is the one they are familiar and comfortable with. However, while lectures accomplish important and valuable purposes (Ayers, 2002), they may not fulfill “learning potential of typical students today”, particularly from the Net Generation. These students want interactive approaches, using computers, but also with the lecturer and fellow students (McNeely, 2005). On the other hand, more flexible options should be investigated since many (Australian) university students are of mature age and combine studies with work and family commitments (Phillips, McNeill, Gosper, Woo, Preston & Green, 2007), and students’ learning styles and approaches to learning vary (Britain, 2004; Clow, 1998), even between on-campus and distance students (Diaz & Cartnal, 1999).

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