Sharing Our Narratives on Developing Our Practice in Online Music Pedagogy

Sharing Our Narratives on Developing Our Practice in Online Music Pedagogy

Carol Johnson (University of Melbourne, Australia), Virginia Christy Lamothe (Belmont University, USA), Flávia Motoyama Narita (Universidade de Brasília, Brazil), Imogen N. Clark (University of Melbourne, Australia), Joseph E. Mulholland (Berklee College of Music, USA) and Nicholaus Meyers (Valley City State University, USA)
Copyright: © 2018 |Pages: 19
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-5109-6.ch012

Abstract

This chapter begins with an introduction focused on the importance of instructor's reflection on his/her teaching practices and pedagogy through the theoretical lens of Schön's work on reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action. Five case narratives are presented that highlight instructors at different entry points into their experiences of teaching music online. The narratives outline significant learning processes that took place as instructors continued on their journey in teaching music online. The implications raised from the narratives identify the need for effective online learning systems for music, institutional support for instructors teaching music online, and a need for online music instructors to have resilience and adaptability when teaching music online. Additionally, the various contexts of teaching music online signals a need for future research in the areas of: active learning for online music courses, appropriate technology tools available with a LMS, and collaborative online music tasks for effective student learning outcomes.
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Importance Of Self-Reflection

The process of self-reflection is not new to teaching, and presents the opportunity for instructors to explore and become aware of their teaching actions through identification of self-knowledge (Wieringa, 2011; Vazir, 2006). By sharing self-knowledge through narrative, willing instructors can take part in the process of inquiry and reflection on their past teaching (Beattie, 2001). Furthermore, ideas, notions and concepts surrounding one’s lived experience (e.g., teaching practice), can be unearthed through the exploration of reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action as identified by Schön (1983, 1987).

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