Some Lessons for Promoting RFID by Applying TAM Theory

Some Lessons for Promoting RFID by Applying TAM Theory

Ramakrishnan Ramanathan (University of Bedfordshire, UK), Usha Ramanathan (Nottingham Trent University, UK) and Lok Wan Lorraine Ko (Nottingham University, UK)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9787-4.ch134
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Literature Survey

Since a detailed exposition of the RFID literature has been presented in another article (Ramanathan et al., 2014), this literature is not repeated here. Instead, the theoretical framework used in this chapter, namely the Technology Assessment Model (TAM), is focussed.

TAM was originally proposed by Davis (1989). The basic assumption of the TAM is that actual use of an innovation depends on the intention to make use of the technology, and that intention depends on individual attitudes toward using the technology and its perceived usefulness (Muller-Seitz et al., 2009). The attitude toward using the technology arises from the perceived usefulness and the perceived ease of use. Many researchers have utilized and validated TAM for use with numerous technological environments. According to Hossain & Prybutok (2008), some studies suggested that TAM successfully predicts an individual’s acceptance of various corporate information technologies. Furthermore, TAM may hold across technologies, people, settings and times. Recently, it has been applied to the introduction of healthcare information systems (Pai & Huang, 2011), RFID technology acceptance at US universities (Hossain & Prybutok, 2008), and RFID technology acceptance in the German electronic retail sector (Muller-Seitz et al., 2009). The research model of these studies were based on TAM and have used the revised TAM proposed by Davis et al. (1989), which include perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and the intention to use. Hossain and Prybutok (2008) extended TAM by adding perceived cultural influence, perceived privacy, perceived regulations’ influence, and perceived security to the model. Table 1 presents the definitions of some common TAM constructs and related literature.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Perceived ease of use: The extent to which an individual believes that using a particular system is free of effort.

Perceived usefulness: The extent to which an individual believes that their job performance is enhanced by using a particular technology.

Perceived Privacy: The degree to which an individual believes that he/she has the right to control the collection and use of his/her personal information, even after he/she has disclosed it to others.

Perceived security: The degree to which an individual feels protected against security threats resulting from the use of RFID technology.

RFID: Radio frequency identification (RFID) is one type of auto-identification technology that uses radio frequency (RF) waves to identify, track and locate individual physical items.

Technology Acceptance Model: A theory to help understand how a new technology gets accepted in organisations. The basic assumption is that actual use of an innovation depends on the intention to make use of the technology, and that intention depends on individual attitudes toward using the technology and its perceived usefulness.

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