Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP): An Empirical Evaluation of Adoption of Formal Approaches to SISP in Australian Organizations

Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP): An Empirical Evaluation of Adoption of Formal Approaches to SISP in Australian Organizations

Zijad Pita (RMIT University, Australia), France Cheong (RMIT University, Australia) and Brian Corbitt (RMIT University, Australia)
Copyright: © 2012 |Pages: 32
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-1589-2.ch013
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This study examines the use of formal Strategic Information Systems Planning (SISP) approaches and methodologies in Australia. The authors analyze the relationships between SISP success, SISP objectives, company size/type and SISP approaches and methodologies. The authors find that the most popular methodologies are not the most successful. Emerging methodologies, such as Fuzzy Cognitive Maps and Information Engineering, could be considered for improving the success of SISP. They also find that a combination of SISP approaches is more successful than the implementation of any one approach. This can be interpreted that the boundary lines that distinguish theoretical approaches are blurred and that SISP theory needs a new way of thinking to stay relevant for practice. In addition, many findings of significant importance to SISP practitioners, in the context of various industries, are presented.
Chapter Preview
Top

Sisp Methodologies

One of the major issues on the IS planning agenda is choosing the right methodology (Lederer & Sethi, 1992; Ang et al., 1995) to enable the IS team to plan and track its SISP activities. A SISP methodology is comprised of one or more techniques where each technique is defined by a set of practices, procedures, and rules. Generally, the use of more than one methodology is preferred.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset