Student Perceptions of Screencast Video Feedback for Summative Assessment Tasks in the Creative Arts

Student Perceptions of Screencast Video Feedback for Summative Assessment Tasks in the Creative Arts

Josh McCarthy (The University of South Australia, Australia)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-0426-0.ch009

Abstract

This chapter evaluates the use of screencast video feedback for summative assessment tasks in the creative arts and analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of such a format when compared to traditional feedback techniques. In 2017, in the second-year course Narrative Animation at the University of South Australia, video feedback was trialed for summative assessment tasks, in an attempt to improve students' understanding of their academic performance. Thirty-seven students participated in the course and received a five-minute feedback video for each of their three submissions. The video feedback provided to students during the course was evaluated at the end of the semester in the form of two online surveys, allowing participating students with the opportunity to critically reflect on the learning experience. The findings of the study disseminate the learning benefits afforded by the video feedback model and provide insight into the varying attitudes of both students and staff.
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Introduction

This chapter evaluates the use of screencast video feedback for summative assessment tasks in the creative arts, and analyses the advantages and disadvantages of such a format when compared to traditional feedback techniques. More specifically, video feedback was trialed in the course Narrative Animation at the University of South Australia, in Australia, in order to improve students’ understanding of their academic performance. Student evaluations of the two previous iterations of the course identified feedback as an area that could be improved in the future, specifically the provision of feedback for summative assessment tasks. As such, in 2017 alternate forms of feedback provision were researched and explored. The second-year course, which sits in the Bachelor of Media Arts program, included three animated video summative assessment tasks, and it was hypothesized that video-based feedback would provide students with a clearer understanding of their academic performance within the course by providing more detailed and relevant commentary on their work. Within this hypothesis, the aim of the case study was to establish the advantages and disadvantages of a screencast video feedback model. To achieve this aim, a series of research questions were established:

  • Does screencast video feedback enable better understanding of academic performance than other feedback methods, such as written, verbal or audio?

  • Does screencast video feedback enable better understanding of academic performance within different student demographics?

  • Are screencast video feedback files accessible: can students access and view video feedback easily?

  • Are screencast video feedback files easy for staff to produce and distribute in a timely manner?

  • What are the workload implications on course staff, for providing screencast video feedback?

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