Supporting Mathematics Teaching Practices in Online Teacher Education: An Example Using Logarithms, pH, and Synchronous Course Meetings

Supporting Mathematics Teaching Practices in Online Teacher Education: An Example Using Logarithms, pH, and Synchronous Course Meetings

David Glassmeyer (Kennesaw State University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-7998-1476-4.ch004

Abstract

In this chapter, the author provides an example of an integrated and collaborative activity for in-service mathematics teachers that was implemented synchronously online. While prior research details how this lesson developed middle and secondary teachers' mathematics content knowledge of logarithms and teachers' science content knowledge concept of pH, this chapter focuses on how the lesson was converted from a face-to-face format to the online format while supporting research-based essential teaching skills, specifically NCTM's Mathematics Teaching Practices (MTPs). Evidence is provided for how three MTPs were upheld using the online platform Blackboard Collaborate, followed by recommendations for other teacher educators wishing to engage teachers in online learning that supports mathematics education goals of integrated STEM education through mathematical discourse, conceptual understanding, and reasoning about mathematical representations.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background Literature

NCTM (2014) summarizes eight research-based mathematics teaching practices that teachers should incorporate in their classrooms. These MTPs include: (1) establish mathematics goals to focus learning; (2) implement tasks that promote reasoning and problem solving; (3) use and connect mathematical representations; (4) facilitate meaningful mathematical discourse; (5) pose purposeful questions; (6) build procedural fluency from conceptual understanding; (7) support productive struggle in learning mathematics; and (8) elicit and use evidence of student thinking. Mathematics teacher educators are also advised to model these practices when working with teachers to serve both as an example and to support mathematics teacher development of content and pedagogical knowledge. These MTPs are detailed in the context of a face-to-face classroom, and mathematics educators are encouraged to model and support the practices in their work with mathematics teachers and mathematics coaches (AMTE, 2017; Baker & Knapp, 2019; Beida, 2016).

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset