Technology-Integrated Curriculum and Students' Academic Performance

Technology-Integrated Curriculum and Students' Academic Performance

James Dixon (University of Phoenix, USA) and Libi Shen (University of Phoenix, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-5519-3.ch005
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Abstract

Technology is shaping our world persistently and swiftly every day. Does the use of technology improve teaching and learning as well as the overall quality of education at schools? To what extent are technology-integrated curricula in an elementary school correlated with students' academic performance on statewide achievement tests? To what extent are technology-integrated curricula in an elementary school correlated with students' computer literacy skills? The aim of this chapter was to identify whether a relationship exists between technology-integrated curriculum and students' academic performance on statewide achievement tests as well as their computer skills in an elemental school in Alabama. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire and archival data. The participants were 113 fifth grade elementary school students. Results from the study and recommendations for school administrators, teachers, and students are provided.
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Background

Students in Alabama’s public schools performed 30% lower on reading, language, mathematics, and computer literacy achievement tests than students in most other states (U.S. DoE, NCES, 2016). The high school dropout rate in Alabama was 29% in 2005, 25% in 2013, and 11% in 2015, which is above the national average of 6.5% (McFarland, Stark, & Cui, 2016). Alabama’s education system was rated lower than other states in part because of students’ low academic performance on statewide achievement tests, students’ low-test scores, and a higher than average high school dropout rate (U.S. DoE, NCES, 2016). The crime rate in Alabama has increased steadily, and some cities in Alabama have been listed among the 100 worst places to live, including Birmingham, which was listed as the fifth highest in crime and third most violent city in the U.S. (“Crime Rate,” 2015).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Mobile Technologies: Portable technologies that facilitate ubiquitous access for users and used for cellular communication.

Technology: Devices designed based on the scientific knowledge to increase efficiency, productivity, collaboration, and entertainment.

Technology-Integrated Curriculum: Course work that includes integrated technologies designed to engage students and enhance learning.

Access: Alabama connecting classrooms, educators, and students statewide, which provides opportunities for students to obtain recovery credits and engage in advanced placement courses.

Academic Performance: Academic achievement of students who meet or exceed performance standards prescribed by course work.

Curriculum: Courses and sequence of instruction in academic program of the study.

OLPC: One laptop per child policy, established to transform education for all children.

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