The Architect of Organizational Psychology: The Geert Hofstede's Dimensions of Cultural (Corporate and Organizational) Identity

The Architect of Organizational Psychology: The Geert Hofstede's Dimensions of Cultural (Corporate and Organizational) Identity

Ben Tran (Alliant International University, USA)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 28
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-1744-3.ch009
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Abstract

Globalization, used in the architect of the organizational psychology world, often evokes images of a shrinking world, in which accelerating flows of information and travel technology compares time and space in the relationships between world cultures, political economies and the built environment. In the world of organizational psychology, the field of organizational psychology is a byproduct of business (organizational behavior and management), psychology [clinical and industrial and organizational psychology (I/O)], and culture. The one common paramount connection between architecture and organizational psychology in the world of globalization is (or the corporate/organization) culture. Hence, the purpose of this chapter is the architect of organizational psychology, with an emphasis on culture. Specifically, Geert Hofstede's dimensions of cultural (corporate and organizational) identity, and how culture influences architecture and business in globalization.
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Introduction

Globalization, used in the architectural world, is a disputed term packed with a rich and intricate array of interpretive possibilities that, once released, raise important questions about architecture, its institutions and its outcomes. Globalization, used in the corporate world, has been associated with flows of capital, labor, products, and ideas that have crossed, challenged, and blurred established national and international boundaries. Globalization, used in the architect of the organizational psychology world, often evokes images of a shrinking world, in which accelerating flows of information and travel technology compares time and space in the relationships between world cultures, political economies and the built environment. Today the idea of the global city, once characterized by nodes of high-rise towers associated with nexuses of capital flows vying for command and control of the world economy, is being reconsidered. With the advances in electronic media and telecommunications, people can live simultaneously in both bounded urban public environments as well as highly constructed personal virtual environments. Such virtual connections permit national formations to be maintained across international boundaries, as individuals construct virtual neighborhoods that sustain a life of what theorist Benedict Anderson refers to as long-distance nationalism (Walker, 2001).

In the world of architecture, the field of architecture is of an island, with estranged connection with engineering, (material) science, geology, art, and culture. In the world of organizational psychology, the field of organizational psychology is a byproduct of business (organizational behavior and management), psychology [clinical and industrial and organizational psychology (I/O)], and culture. The one common paramount connection between architecture and organizational psychology in the world of globalization is (or the corporate/organization) culture. Hence, the purpose of this chapter is the architect of organizational psychology, with an emphasis on culture. Specifically, Geert Hofstede’s dimensions of cultural (corporate and organizational) identity, and how culture influences architecture and business in globalization. Thus, this chapter will cover:

  • 1.

    Identity and architectural heritage.

  • 2.

    Globalization and architecture.

  • 3.

    Geert Hofstede’s dimensions of culture.

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Identity And Architectural Heritage: Historical Perspective

The term identity is defined in the Oxford English Dictionary (Crowther, 1995) as the state of being very like or the same as something or somebody, or the state of being closely involved with a part of something. The core meaning of any national identity is a sense of sameness over time and space. Presently it seems that everyone claims a right to identity— architecture for academic and organizations for business. Nations demands identity as if it were a necessity of life itself, a sacred objective, because it brings power by sustaining certain subjective positions and social boundaries (Saliya, 1986). Identity is a huge part of who we are, and identity is the end result of many factors combine to shape identity such as genetic, social, cultural factors, and the build environment.

Architecture can be best defined as the art and science of integrating the physical environment within a socio space-time organization. It can also be seen as a gesture and its insertion within any context should be aesthetically relevant (Vale, 1997). Aesthetics, a Greek word meaning perceptions and feelings, are the feelings that this integration process and their arrangements prompt us to have. This argument raises the question of the morality of architecture: that is considering architectural heritage in modern designs. Heritage can be understood as a pure human instinct that comes from the knowledge and benefiting ways that nature revealed though trails and experiences. Heritage sites are considered as our tangible and intangible identity and collective memory. It is sustained by remembering and what is remembered and what is remembered is defined by the assumed identity.

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