The Effects of Culture and Data Collection Mode on Socially Desirable Distortion and Confidentiality Concerns in Survey Research

The Effects of Culture and Data Collection Mode on Socially Desirable Distortion and Confidentiality Concerns in Survey Research

Tom E. Yoon (Western Connecticut State University, USA), Samuel H. Goh (University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA), Robert Zinko (Texas A&M University – Central Texas, USA) and Christopher P. Furner (East Carolina University, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-8933-4.ch002

Abstract

Internet-based surveys have emerged as a popular data collection method for researchers. Despites the popularity of Internet-based surveys, prior studies suggest that responses collected via internet-based surveys are not equivalent to those collected via paper-based survey. Thus, it is important to understand why the nonequivalence is occurred. Also, since internet-based surveys enable us to collect data from people around the globe, it would be important to understand how cultural differences influence participants' responses. In this study, the authors investigate the effects that espoused national culture and data collection mode have on confidentiality concerns and socially desirable reporting. Results indicate that data collection mode and espoused power distance influence confidentiality concerns, while data collection mode and collectivism influence socially desirable distortion.
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Background

Before developing the hypotheses that will address our research question, we first review relevant literature on data collection modes, espoused national culture, confidentiality concerns and socially desirable reporting.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Espoused Uncertainty Avoidance: The extent to which the individuals fears risk.

Anonymity: A condition in which the identity of individual subjects is not known to researchers.

Confidentiality Concerns: The perception that the information about a subject that is collected by a researcher will not be shared with another party.

Espoused Masculinity: The extent to which the individual views the world as competitive rather than nurturing.

Social Desirability Distortion: The tendency of subjects to distort their responses to questions in order to appear to conform to the norms of some social group.

Espoused Collectivism: The extent to which an individual values relationships with their in-group.

Espoused Power Distance: The extent to which and individual perceives a power differences between themselves and their superiors and subordinates.

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