The Internet, Social Media, and Knowledge Production and Development of Political Marketing

The Internet, Social Media, and Knowledge Production and Development of Political Marketing

Nyarwi Ahmad (University of Gadjah Mada Yogyakarta, Indonesia)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 32
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-0495-5.ch009
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Abstract

Though the use and development of the Internet, World Wide Web and social media and their impacts on politics have been robustly investigated, specific attention has not yet been paid to explore the impact of adaptation and use of social media by political actors and organizations on the knowledge production and generation of political marketing. In order to fill this knowledge gap, a conceptual framework to explore modes of knowledge production and generation of political marketing has been proposed. The transcendental realism approach postulated by Bhaskar (1998, 2008) and the meta-theoretical assumptions of political marketing proposed by Henneberg (2008) were adopted. A content analysis of 320 articles of Journal of Political Marketing published in between 2002 and 2015 was carried out. This work reveals that the adaptation and use of the Internet and social media have been accounted for in producing and generating the operational or the rudimentary-conceptual or the established-conceptual knowledge of political marketing.
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The Media, Ict Developments, And Political Marketing

The changing landscapes of the media, the development of ICT and the adaptation of the Internet have carved a huge impact on politics, political marketing and campaigning. They have been widely seen of being important as essential factors that determine not only the strategies and practices of political marketing, but also the development of theories and concepts of political marketing (Lees-Marshment, 2001, 2004, 2008; Stromback, 2007; Stromback, et.al, 2012; Ormrod, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011; Ormrod & Henneberg, 2009, 2010a, 2010b). Some researchers have suggested that they need to be taken into further account practices of political marketing and to develop theories and concepts of political marketing (Harrop, 1990: 227; Lock & Harris, 1996: 21; Henneberg & O’ Shaughnessy, 2007: 22; Henneberg, 2008: 171; O’Shaughnessy, 2010: 1050-1051; Temple & Savigny, 2010; Temple, 2013).

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