The Learning Curve in Emergency Preparedness: Are We Getting Better?

The Learning Curve in Emergency Preparedness: Are We Getting Better?

Marianne Robin Russo (Florida Atlantic University, USA), Valerie Bryan (Florida Atlantic University, USA) and Gerri Penney (Palm Beach County Fire Rescue, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-6256-8.ch012
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Abstract

This chapter addresses post-9/11 emergency preparedness, which has been a point of scrutiny regarding the effectiveness and efficiency of response systems, the role of ICT, and how these methods affect first responders and the socially vulnerable, as well as infrastructure concerns stemming from natural and person-caused disasters. The main objective of this chapter is to describe the ongoing solutions that must be incorporated in terms of information and ICT preparation, social media communications, Community Response Grid (CRG), and social networking. The authors propose new programs that must continuously be explored with a variety of partners to assure that programs and policies for the socially marginalized are mitigated. Finally, the authors explore ways to augment the emergency learning curve through using the cooperation of government so funding and policies are in place to prevent infrastructure weakness, pre- and post-disaster, and to protect the lives and well-being of the citizenry.
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An Overview Of Emergency Management

Disaster declarations are classified in two ways: major disasters and emergencies ((U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Transportation Infrastructure, 2012). Natural disasters that necessitate major disaster assistance and resources by governmental entities are considered a major disaster, while “emergencies authorize fewer types of assistance and do not require a stated level disaster declaration or a request from the governor” (U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Transportation Infrastructure, 2012, p. 7).

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