The Motivation Elements, Components, and Characteristics of an Outstanding Coach

The Motivation Elements, Components, and Characteristics of an Outstanding Coach

DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-5948-1.ch003

Abstract

The research discussed throughout this chapter was designed to examine, understand, and explain the key motivational characteristics, elements, and components of outstanding retention and success coaching. The motivational elements of the study are organized using the choice, persistence, and mental effort framework from Clark and Estes (2008) and Eccles and Wigfield (2002). Through interviews and focus groups of elite coaches, the study assessed the motivation of the most successful coaches as well as the core values, beliefs, and sensitivities to background and cultural norms that suggest that an individual can be developed into an excellent coach. The chapter further explains how institutions and organizations can select for these values and beliefs through a careful hiring process that results in the recruitment of the right talent pool for entry-level coaching positions.
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Overview Of 2015-16 Study Of Insidetrack Coaching

The 2015 coaching study utilized the Clark and Estes (2008) Knowledge, Motivation and Organization (KMO) framework to organize, articulate and build the information necessary to understand, evaluate and explain coaching as a promising retention practice and strategy. This chapter focuses on the second Clark and Estes component, motivation. Clark and Estes organize the motivational elements of their framework using, choice, persistence and mental effort and that framework in utilized to organize the data and findings throughout this Chapter. The motivation component of the study was also designed to develop an understanding of the values, self-efficacy, mood and perspective of the coaches that enhance student retention, resilience, and student success (Clark & Estes, 2008; Eccles & Wigfield, 2002; Parsloe & Leedham, 2016). The study evaluated the impact of these motivation components on positive retention outcomes for the client institutions, successful student relationships for the coaches, and positive outcomes for the students.

Assumed Motivation Assets of Outstanding Coaches

Prior to data collection, it was assumed that the coaches possessed a strong and broad set of motivational assets that enabled and supported them in effectively coaching online students in a manner that improved student success and student retention rates. In the area of motivation, the analysis framework was based on assumptions surrounding the values, self-efficacy, mood and perspective of the coaches that enhance student retention, resilience and student success (Clark & Estes, 2008; Eccles & Wigfield, 2002; Parsloe & Leedham, 2009). It was assumed that the coaches valued their students and were confident about their ability to retain them, which creates a positive and productive motivational cycle for the students and the coaches (Senge, 2006; Vygotsky, 1978). It was also assumed that the coaches were consistently motivated throughout the term and that there was value to the consistency of their motivational work (Parsloe & Leedham, 2009). In the area of choice, the assumption was that the coaches actively chose to engage with all of their students and worked through individual retention challenges on a regular and consistent basis while persisting throughout the term. In the area of effort, the assumption was that the coaches invested a great deal of mental effort to systematically and consistently engage with and help their students actively address individual retention and success challenges (Parsloe & Leedham, 2016).

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