The Role of Implicit and Explicit Feedback in Learning and the Implications for Distance Education Techniques

The Role of Implicit and Explicit Feedback in Learning and the Implications for Distance Education Techniques

Jurjen van der Helden (Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands) and Harold Bekkering (Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5162-3.ch025
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors review the cognitive scientific state-of-the-art relevant for Distance Education (DE) followed by an overview of how different aspects of Distance Education relate to such cognitive mechanisms. The goal is to list and categorize the cognitive advantages and disadvantages of DE and consider and discuss how cognitive factors can be negotiated in new developments in DE. The authors argue that modern DE provides excellent opportunities to supplement traditional DE by the providing of contingent feedback while meeting the learner's need to stay intrinsically motivated.
Chapter Preview
Top

Background

‘Learning is the residue of thought’, as it was concisely concluded by Daniel Willingham (2009). How do we think? What do we think about? We will argue that thinking is essentially bodily embedded. Embodied Embedded Cognition (EEC), or grounded cognition, in short, argues that cognitive functions are scaffolded on basic and available mechanisms that can aid to achieve the organisms goal. High-end human cognitive capacities are grounded by more low-end, fundamental capacities and high-end capacities are often impaired if the low-end capacities are compromised, of which we will show a few relevant examples below. Hence, low-end capacities, in particular motor skills, are crucial to what we think about and how we think, and, consequently, what we learn. Learning always occurs in the context of what is already available.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset