The Roles of Organizational Justice, Social Justice, and Organizational Culture in Global Higher Education

The Roles of Organizational Justice, Social Justice, and Organizational Culture in Global Higher Education

Kijpokin Kasemsap (Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Thailand)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-9850-5.ch004
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Abstract

This chapter reveals the roles of organizational justice, social justice, and organizational culture in global higher education, thus describing the practical and theoretical concepts of organizational justice, social justice, and organizational culture; the significance of organizational justice in global higher education; the significance of social justice in global higher education; and the significance of organizational culture in global higher education. The appropriateness of organizational justice, social justice, and organizational culture is influential for global higher education that seeks to serve practitioners and researchers, increase educational performance, sustain competitiveness, and fulfill expected accomplishment in global higher education. The chapter argues that applying organizational justice, social justice, and organizational culture has the potential to improve educational performance and reach strategic goals in global higher education.
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Background

Organizational justice research has highlighted the importance of perceptions of justice for work behavior and motivation (Colquitt, Conlon, Wesson, Porter, & Ng, 2001; Loi, Hang-yue, & Foley, 2006). Organizational justice is concerned with the rules developed to take decisions on the distribution of acquisitions (e.g., tasks, goods, services, rewards, punishments, wages, organizational positions, opportunities, and roles among employees) and societal norms that constitute the basis for organizational justice (Folger & Cropanzano, 1998). A strong emphasis on organizational justice is an important element of ethical organizations (Greenberg & Bies, 1992).

There has been a growing interest in social justice issues in education (McMahon, 2007; Place, Ballenger, Wasonga, Piveral, & Edmonds, 2010; Theoharis, 2007). Educational leaders should act as the moral agents concerning social justice issues (Bates, 2006; Greenfield, 2004; Marshall, 2004). Educational leaders are continually urged to examine how educational problems are formed in a broad social context (Adams & Copland, 2005). Adopting a socio-ecological viewpoint on social justice efforts in education broadens the focus on leadership actions in schools and emphasizes the requirement to merge with complementary leadership actions in a broader social context (Berkovich, 2014).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Culture: A pattern of responses discovered, developed, or invented during the group's history of handling problems which arise from interactions among its members, and between them and their environment.

Education: The wealth of knowledge acquired by an individual after studying particular subject matters or experiencing life lessons that provide an understanding of something.

Organizational Culture: The values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization.

Justice: The fairness in protection of rights and punishment of wrongs.

Attitude: A tendency to respond positively or negatively toward a certain idea, object, person, or situation.

Organizational Justice: The study of the concerns about fairness in the workplace.

Value: The important and lasting belief shared by the members of a culture about what is good or bad and desirable or undesirable.

Behavior: A response of an individual or group to an action, environment, person, or stimulus.

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