Thermography in Animal Models of Cancer: A Tool for Studying Oncobiology in Laboratory Animals

Thermography in Animal Models of Cancer: A Tool for Studying Oncobiology in Laboratory Animals

Rui M. Gil da Costa (LEPABE, CI-IPOP,University of Porto, Portugal), António Ramos Silva (INEGI, University of Porto, Portugal), Ana Faustino Rocha (CITAB, QOPNA University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal), Paula Alexandra Oliveira (CITAB, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Portugal), Joaquim Gabriel (INEGI, University of Porto, Portugal), Ana Margarida Abrantes (Biophysics Institute, University of Coimbra, Portugal) and Maria Filomena Botelho (CIMAGO, CNC.IBILI, University of Coimbra, Portugal)
Copyright: © 2017 |Pages: 27
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-5225-2072-6.ch011
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Abstract

Laboratory animals provide important models for studying human diseases, including many types of cancer. Mice are among the most commonly used laboratory animals, allowing for the study of carcinogenic agents, cancer development and for testing innovative preventive and therapeutic strategies. Thus, monitoring angiogenesis in animal models is a major goal for cancer research. Among the currently available imaging techniques, thermography is a useful approach for studying the superficial vascularization of cancer, based on their heat emissions. At this chapter emphasis is placed on thermography and its applications on laboratory animals, in comparison with other available and applicable imaging techniques. In conclusion, thermography may be usefully applied to the study of cancer vascularization in animal models, particularly when using laboratory rodents such as mice. Care is needed in adapting existing approaches to the specificities of each animal species.
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Angiogenesis In Cancer

One key feature of the interaction between cancer cells and their adjacent stroma is the development of new, and often abundant, blood vessels, termed angiogenesis (Potente, Gerhardt, Carmeliet, 2011). Tumor-associated angiogenesis is of particular importance clinically and also from the viewpoint of thermographic analysis, as it provides the basis for temperature differences between healthy and tumoral tissues (Carmeliet & Jain, 2011).

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