Threats to the Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP) Posed by Modern Terrorism

Threats to the Critical Information Infrastructure Protection (CIIP) Posed by Modern Terrorism

Metodi Hadji-Janev (International Relations and International Security Law, Republic of Macedonia)
Copyright: © 2014 |Pages: 21
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5942-1.ch109
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Abstract

The emergence of new non-state actors in the post Cold War reality has dramatically changed security environment around the globe. Modern terrorism practiced by Al Qaeda and its associated movement (AQAM) has posed serious threat to critical information infrastructure given the trend of connecting control systems that run these infrastructures to the internet. Although AQAM have not been successful to launch a cyber-attack that will cause mass casualties, environment damage, or financial effects, the possibility remains alarming since creativity in the age of globalization never ends. Additionally, by using the so called “dot-com culture,” modern terrorists effectively employ negative effects of globalization to rich to the societies' remote pockets and Islamic social nomads and thus enlarge their capabilities to affect our critical information infrastructure. Therefore, to effectively protect our CII from modern terrorists we need to consider comprehensive and holistic approach build on direct and indirect mechanisms.
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1. Process Of Globalization And The Security Environment After The Cold War

Influence of globalization and the emergence of new non-state actors in the post Cold War reality have dramatically changed security environment around the globe. This “Big Thing”-globalization as described by Friedman (2002) has become a driving force in international affairs (p xxi). Labeling it as a tectonic shift, Friedman describes globalization as an international system with its own rules and logic that influences the geopolitics and economics (p xxii). Despite the fact that globalization is largely associated with open markets and free trade many argue that globalization is technology driven.

Fukuyama (1992) claims that thanks to technology liberal democracies had grown sufficiently aware and interconnected to protect against cataclysmic warfare among superpowers, marking an end to the Cold War. Therefore he believes that the “expansion of globalization occurs most rapidly in lands that nurture the freedom of expression and enterprise” (p. 23-25). In this context Mead (2004), explains how “the glorious triumph of technology and entrepreneurial spirit over a decadent and stagnant era”, offer “new and more dynamic opportunities to eliminate poverty and transform the human condition” (p. 71). Expansion of globalization supported by the development of technology supposed to reduce world poverty and contribute to a stable economic growth and peace (Stiglitz, 2003).

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