Three Strategies for the Use of Distance Learning Technology in Higher Education

Three Strategies for the Use of Distance Learning Technology in Higher Education

William E. Rayburn (Austin Peay State University, USA) and Arkalgud Ramaprasad (Southern Illinois University, USA)
Copyright: © 2002 |Pages: 16
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-931777-04-9.ch003
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Abstract

“University A” is a small, private liberal arts school with a religious affiliation. Located in a large city, it draws locally and from its particular religious group. With an enrollment under 3,000, it carries a Carnegie Classification of Baccalaureate II and has its own board of trustees. The school has pushed the use of new technology in instruction. For instance, it was one of the first schools in its area to install a fiber optic network across campus. Programs such as business feature the active use of technology to enhance learning. For example, in an international business course, students develop links with fellow students in other countries. However, University A differs from other schools that have embraced new information and communication technology; it has rejected some uses as not appropriate to the mission of the school. For instance, University A will not use videoconferencing to send instruction to remote sites. Why? School leaders feel that a significant part of a student’s experience at University A comes from faculty providing role models, and that role modeling cannot be done through a television monitor.

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