Transformations of the Language Laboratory

Transformations of the Language Laboratory

Mads Bo-Kristensen (Resource Centre for Integration – Vejle, Denmark) and Bente Meyer (School of Education, Univeristy of Aarhus, Denmark)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-970-0.ch003
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the relationship between remediation and educational innovation in Information and Communications Technology- (ICT) intensive learning environments, as exemplified by the language laboratory (language lab) and its digital descendants. Historically, the language laboratory has been affected by a number of technological and instructional changes, transforming the dead-end of behavioural methodology into the current socio-collaborative paradigms of language learning. The language laboratory has thus been transformed into a learning environment that incorporates and refers to several generations of technology-based language learning. The principles of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) will serve as this chapter’s theoretical framework. It will also deal with the issues of repurposing and remediation raised by Bolter & Grusin (1999). Remediation is defined as a process of transformation wherein older media are represented and refashioned in new media contexts. It will also be argued that there is a dialogical relationship between the processes of remediation inherent in the genealogy of the language laboratory, and the processes of educational innovation. In addition to this, the chapter will suggest ways of rethinking and reforming the language laboratory through Mobile-Assisted Language Learning (MALL).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Redidacitisation: Redidactisation can be understood as the process through which traditional ways of teaching and learning are integrated into new media and embrace the potentials of these media.

Authenticity: Authenticity is central to modern language learning theory. Authentic learning content reflects the real-life situations in which the language student is going to use and face the foreign or second language.

Behaviouristic Approach: Learning approach whereby language, e.g., is learned through trial-and-error leaving no room for reflection.

Communicative Approach: Learning approach whereby language, e.g, is learned through communicative content and activities

Integrative Approach: Learning approach whereby, e.g., is learned through task-based, project-based and content-based activities.

Hypermediacy: Hypermediacy relies on the act of making representations visible by multiplying the signs of mediation, for instance in the heterogeneous, windowed visual style of web pages.

Remediation: Remediation is defined as a process of transformation wherein older media are represented and refashioned in new media contexts.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset