Video Modeling for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Video Modeling for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Christine R. Ogilvie (University of West Florida, USA) and Peggy Whitby (University of Arkansas, USA)
Copyright: © 2014 |Pages: 18
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-5792-2.ch013
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) will struggle to different degrees with social communication skills. To facilitate the learning of new social skills and to allow for repetition and practice, video modeling is being utilized in the PreK-12 setting. This chapter describes behaviors inherent to individuals with autism spectrum disorders that could benefit from the use of video modeling as an intervention, or part of an intervention, as well as a step-by-step description on how to effectively implement video modeling. Additionally, examples of data collection forms, permission forms, and other helpful resources are provided.
Chapter Preview
Top

Introduction

According to the National Autism Center (NAC) (2009), video modeling is a research-based intervention that can be used to enhance communication, cognitive functions, personal responsibility and play/social skills, it can also decrease problem behaviors and sensory/emotional difficulties. There are several types of video modeling techniques, often times video modeling is combined with other types of strategies such as prompting and reinforcement. In order for video modeling to serve as an effective intervention, teachers, parents, and Individualized Education Program (IEP) teams must first understand the research behind the effectiveness, the types and components of video modeling, and how to create and then implement the intervention with fidelity. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the behaviors inherent in individuals with autism spectrum disorders that could benefit from the use of video modeling as an intervention or part of an intervention as well as a step by step description on how to effectively implement video modeling interventions. Additionally, examples of data collection forms, permission forms, and other helpful resources will be provided. Finally, a comprehensive list of further reading and web resources highlighting the research-base behind video modeling is included.

Box 1. Case study part 1: Introducing Noah
Noah is a twelve year old boy with a diagnosis of Asperger’s syndrome. He is currently starting sixth grade and is in mostly general education classes with the exception of a study/social skills class in the resource room setting and a gifted math class. Since transitioning from elementary to middle school, Noah has experienced a lot of changes in his daily schedule, some of which resulted in a full meltdown at school due to his difficulty in handling unexpected changes. Last week in the cafeteria, Noah’s lunch period was interrupted by a fire drill. Noah refused to leave the cafeteria with his classmates and began to pace up and down near the lunch table. When approached by a peer who asked Noah to walk outside with him, Noah became upset and yelled to “Leave me alone and let me eat my lunch!” Noah put his hands over his ears and hummed. He was approached by his math teacher who spoke softly to Noah and was able to lead him out of the cafeteria with the rest of his class. Outside, Noah continued to block his ears and hum and refused to stand with his class.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset