When Twentieth Century Minds Design for Twenty-First Century Distance Learning

When Twentieth Century Minds Design for Twenty-First Century Distance Learning

Robert D. Wright (University of North Texas, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-672-8.ch004
OnDemand PDF Download:
$30.00
List Price: $37.50

Abstract

This chapter examines the changes that twentieth century minds must undergo if they are to successfully design for today’s distance learners. Traditional classroom practices must be adapted to accommodate the interactive and distributed nature that defines effective contemporary distance learning. The learning theories, cognitive processes, and educational media that shaped the minds of instructional developers, technologists, and teachers who were born in the twentieth century differ from those required for twentyfirst century learning. Raised and educated before computers were personal, in an era when distance learning consisted of adult education correspondence courses or head-in-a-box instructional television, and when instruction delivery was teacher-centered, educational professionals must now utilize theories, strategies, practices, and resources that are foreign to their learning backgrounds and experiences. Just as important, they must overcome views of interactive media and distance learning that differ greatly from those they seek to educate.
Chapter Preview
Top

The Products Of Two Centuries

The education of the instructional developers, technologists, and teachers who were born in the Twentieth Century was vastly different from what is being delivered today. Educational computing did not exist for most; distance learning was print-based for many. Instructional media was crude by today’s standards; and it was not an element of mainstream education. To understand how Twentieth Century Minds can design for Twenty-first Century Learners, we must first understand the differences between the two.

Complete Chapter List

Search this Book:
Reset