WLAN Systems for Communication in Transportation Systems: Towards the Benefits of a Cooperative Vehicular Approach

WLAN Systems for Communication in Transportation Systems: Towards the Benefits of a Cooperative Vehicular Approach

Riccardo Scopigno (Istituto Superiore Mario Boella (ISMB), Italy)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-8473-7.ch071
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Abstract

Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks (VANETs) are wireless networks primarily meant to enforce vehicular safety. The incumbent international VANET solution is based on an adaptation of WLAN to the 5.9 GHz band and to the vehicular environment: it is universally known as IEEE 802.11p. One of the main reasons for the success of IEEE 802.11p lies on the functional requirement of a decentralized solution, that is, one able to work in the absence of infrastructure. While Filed-Operational Tests are being developed world-wide and new VANET applications, not restricted to safety, are being developed, new requisites are emerging. Some limitations of the IEEE 802.11p are coming to light as well: stakeholders must be aware of them to prevent misleading conclusions on reliability and, most importantly, improper solutions for the safety which the protocol is aimed at.
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Vehicular Ad-Hoc Networks

The paradigm of ad-hoc networks requires that wireless devices communicate with each other directly: hence, wireless nodes, which are in the respective radio ranges, mutually discover and communicate in peer-to-peer fashion, without involving any central coordinators. While the infrastructure mode (with the so called access points - AP) is the most common way in which WiFi is used, the ad-hoc mode is already included in WiFi IEEE 802.11 (2007).

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