Call for Chapters: Bridging Gaps in Human Resource Development Through Scholar-Practitioners

Editors

Claretha Hughes, University of Arkansas, United States
Matthew Gosney, University of Colorado, Denver, United States

Call for Chapters

Proposals Submission Deadline: February 20, 2024
Full Chapters Due: March 31, 2024
Submission Date: March 31, 2024

Introduction

The gap between the scholar and practitioner continues to evolve. Scholars and practitioners continue to seek ways to bridge the gaps that remain. Knowledge transfer is an identified challenge in bridging the scholar-practitioner gap. This text will extend previous research that has sought to address the gap. Gautam (2008) identified four potential barriers (discovery, translation, dissemination, and change) that may inhibit academic research from being more engaged with practice. Discovery is “the creation of knowledge through rigorous research that provides the scientific foundation of a discipline” (p. 156). Translation refers to adapting generalized findings from the discovery stage into a form useful to target populations. Overcoming the translation barrier requires academic research be presented in the format that is “coherent and digestible” for practitioners. Dissemination requires transmitting translated research findings to end users and practitioners, which can be accomplished through different channels such as social media and publications. Change involves the implementation of practices triggered by research-based evidence so that organizational practices can be improved by scientific evidence.

Objective

Many questions have been asked seeking to overcome the four barriers such as 1) Why have talent development practitioners, professionals, and academics not been successful in bridging the research and practice gap? 2) Who is in the best position to bridge the gap? Talent development academics, professionals, practitioners, or all of them? 3) What can talent development academics, practitioners, and professionals do to effectively close the gap? The objectives of this book are: 1) To expand the knowledge base to bridge the gap between research and practice. 2) To identify effective strategies that have integrated research into practice and/or align practice with research theory. 3) Help organizations, researchers, practitioners, and professionals better understand and value research and use it to improve practice vice versa. Hughes (2021) has identified five key strategies to bridge the gap between research and practice. The following five key strategies and tools are offered that can be used to narrow the gap between research and practice. 1. Understand knowledge production versus knowledge creation through collaborative efforts. 2. Develop collaborative research projects to solve relevant, current problems and adjust to changes. 3. Pay consultants for results instead of billable hours; academics may have solutions but not the time to spend inside organizations. 4. Disseminate information on how research informs practice and practice informs research. 5. Design research to study the effectiveness of existing techniques and approaches used by practitioners. Scholar-practitioners work in numerous roles within different organizations and the influences of the organization contribute the effectiveness of the HRD scholar-practitioner. The research literature on organizational change needs to be reviewed to provide depth to how scholar-practitioners can implement change initiatives that impact the divide between research and practice within their organization. According to Moran and Brightman (2000), to manage change within organizations, leaders must understand the three most powerful drivers of work behavior: purpose, identity, and mastery in individuals. Leaders of change efforts must inspire individuals to align work behavior components and the environment effectively with the necessary organizational change effort. More research is needed to assess scholar-practitioners' perception or organizational change and how they may contribute to and/or lead research and practice change efforts within organizations. Hulin (2001) argued that research does not have to have immediately apparent practical application to be sound for practice while Latham (2001) argued that time was the issue of concern when integrating research and practice. More research is needed to support these theories and assess why barriers and challenges continue to exist despite attempts to bridge the gap by organizations such as Association of Talent Development (ATD) and the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD) within the field of HRD (Short, 2006b). Scholar-practitioners are working to close the gap between research and practice and are actively involved in trying to include valid and reliable research within their practice. Researchers are seeking empirical evidence to provide a foundation for HRD researchers to bridge the gap between theory and practice in HRD. We have several publications on the topic: 1. Hughes, C, Wang, J., Zheng, W., & McLean, L. (2010). Implementation concerns of scholar-practitioners: A pilot study of the link between research and practice. The International Journal of Asian Business and Information Management, 1(2), 33-47. 2. Gedro, J., & Wang, J. (2013). Creating civil and respectful organizations through the scholar-practitioner bridge. Advances in Developing Human Resources. 1-12. doi: 10.1177/1523422313488062 3. Banks, C., Wang, J., Zheng, W., & McLean, L. (2007). Human resource development scholar-practitioners: Connecting the broken divide of research and practice. In F. M., Nafukho & T. Chermak (Eds.), Proceedings of the Academy of Human Resource Development International Research Conference in the Americas (36-2). Bowling Green, OH: Academy of Human Resource Development. This text will define scholar-practitioner as follows: Short (2006a) defined an HRD scholar practitioner as follows: HRD scholar-practitioners operate as a bridge between HRD research and HRD practice to improve the understanding and practice of HRD. They ground their practice in research and theory, they are champions of research and theory in the workplace and in professional associations, they conduct research, and they disseminate findings from their own research and practice. They are partners with academics and with other practitioners. (p. 261) However, there are many factors that restrict the integration of theory and practice. Short et al., (2006) found that "many of the same factors are used by different disciplines to describe reasons for the gap between research and practice" (p. 269) including: researchers are disconnected from the world of practice; research questions do not address issues of importance to practitioners; research methodologies do not provide answers to practitioner questions; research is not being disseminated in ways that are likely to influence practice; there is a lack of education and training for practitioners in the understanding and use of research; there are limited opportunities to bring together practitioners and researchers. (p. 269)

Target Audience

This book is geared towards human resource development scholars, practitioners, and professionals; human resource management scholars, practitioners, and professionals who are dedicated to developing employees; and other leaders and managers who interact with employees.

Recommended Topics

Introduction a. Define Scholar, Practitioner, and Scholar-Practitioner b. Define Theory and Practice c. Describe HRD Theory and Practice Part 1: Understand knowledge production versus knowledge creation through collaborative efforts. a. Publish in both practitioner and academic publications. b. Read research, case law, and best practices. Part 2: Develop collaborative research projects to solve relevant, current problems and adjust to changes. a. Use your practice (non-proprietary information) to inform academia. b. Design applied academic opportunities for practitioners and professionals from academic research. c. Develop assessments with practitioners and professionals to learn what their knowledge production and knowledge creation needs are. d. Collaborate with practitioners and professionals for readability of academic work in professional publications. e. Create research-to-practice and practice-to-research affinity groups. f. Determine the best method(s) for students, researchers, practitioners, and professionals to identify problems including honest dialogue and exploration. Part 3: Pay consultants for results instead of billable hours; academics may have solutions but not the time to spend inside organizations. a. Distinguish fads and unsubstantiated trends from relevant, applicable initiatives; assess the difference between rhetoric and reality. b. Specify the value of bridging the research and practice gap to solve specific problems to researchers, professionals, and practitioners. c. Align research expertise of researchers, practitioners, professionals, and students. Part 4: Disseminate information on how research informs practice and practice informs research. a. Disseminate and integrate research findings into teaching curriculum, applied projects, and training content. b. Provide sufficient training in using research for practitioners and professionals. Part 5: Design research to study the effectiveness of existing techniques and approaches used by practitioners. a. Use research methods such as case study, historical, applied, and action-based to align and collaborate with practitioners. b. Expand upon the knowledge base to bridge the gap between research and practice in HRD. c. Offer researchers ways to further explore effective ways to integrate research into practice and/or align practice with theory. Part 6: Valuing the Alignment of HRD and Management Theory and Practice

Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before February 20, 2024, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by March 1, 2024 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines.Full chapters are expected to be submitted by March 31, 2024, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at https://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Bridging Gaps in Human Resource Development Through Scholar-Practitioners. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.



Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the "Information Science Reference" (formerly Idea Group Reference), "Medical Information Science Reference," "Business Science Reference," and "Engineering Science Reference" imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit https://www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2025.



Important Dates

February 20, 2024: Proposal Submission Deadline
March 1, 2024: Notification of Acceptance
March 31, 2024: Full Chapter Submission
May 12, 2024: Review Results Returned
May 26, 2024: Final Acceptance Notification
June 2, 2024: Final Chapter Submission



Inquiries

Claretha Hughes University of Arkansas Chbanks@uark.edu Matthew Gosney University of Colorado, Denver gosneyfamily@gmail.com

Classifications


Business and Management; Computer Science and Information Technology; Education; Library and Information Science; Medical, Healthcare, and Life Sciences; Media and Communications; Government and Law; Social Sciences and Humanities; Science and Engineering
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