Architecture of a Massively Parallel Processing Nano-Brain Operating 100 Billion Molecular Neurons Simultaneously

Architecture of a Massively Parallel Processing Nano-Brain Operating 100 Billion Molecular Neurons Simultaneously

Anirban Bandyopadhyay (Advanced Scanning Probe Microscopy Group and Advanced Nano Characterization Center, Japan), Daisuke Fujita (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan) and Ranjit Pati (Michigan Technological University, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 31
DOI: 10.4018/jnmc.2009010104
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Abstract

Molecular machines (MM, Badjic, 2004; Collier, 2000; Jian & Tour, 2003; Koumura & Ferringa, 1999; Ding & Seeman 2006) may resolve three distinct bottlenecks of scientific advancement. Nanofactories (Phoenix, 2003) composed of MM may produce atomically perfect products spending a negligible amount of energy (Hess, 2004) thus alleviating the energy crisis. Computers made by MM operating thousands of bits at a time may match biological processors mimicking creativity and intelligence (Hall, 2007), thus far considered as the prerogative of nature. State-of-the-art brain surgeries are not yet without fatalities, but MMs guided by a nano-brain may execute perfect bloodless surgery (Freitas, 2005). Even though all three bottlenecks converge to a single necessity, the nano-brain, futurists and molecular engineers have remained silent on this issue. Our recent invention of 16-bit parallel processor is a first step in this direction (Bandyopadhyay, 2008). However, the device operates inside ultra-high vacuum chamber. For practical application, one needs to design a 3D standalone architecture

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