The Influence of Computer-Based In-Class Examination Security Software on Students' Attitudes and Examination Performance

The Influence of Computer-Based In-Class Examination Security Software on Students' Attitudes and Examination Performance

Lori Baker-Eveleth (University of Idaho, USA), Daniel M. Eveleth (University of Idaho, USA), Michele O’Neill (University of Idaho, USA) and Robert W. Stone (University of Idaho, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/jicte.2008040101
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Abstract

Expectancy theory is applied to the use of software that secures the testing environment of in-class examinations. This security software prohibits students from viewing unauthorized material during an examination. The empirical study collected 60 student questionnaire responses completed after using the security software. These responses were used to develop measures for a model derived from expectancy theory. Using structural equation modeling, the model was estimated twice for two different variables. These dependent variables were student attitude towards the security software and the student’s examination grade. The empirical results indicated that student attitudes were positively impacted by self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the software’s ease of use. However, student grade was not influenced by any measures in the model. It is concluded that the security software is neutral with regard to student performance, while there are manageable actions faculty can take to positively impact student attitude towards security software.

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