Calls for Papers (special): International Journal of Conceptual Structures and Smart Applications (IJCSSA)


Special Issue On: Smart Applications in Smart Cities

Submission Due Date
2/29/2016

Guest Editors
Ardavan Amini (Birmingham City University, UK)
Luis Hernandez-Munoz (Birmingham City University, UK)

Introduction

Smart cities are characterised by the use of information and digital communication technologies to reduce the costs caused by the growing social, economic and environmental challenges that cities are facing, whilst simultaneously engaging more effectively and actively with their citizens to improve the quality and performance of public services. The divergent requirements of lower cost and the need to do more with less, whilst providing better public services demand that computing technology better supports the human endeavour needed for delivering the smart city given such a challenging constraint.



Objective

A tenet of conceptual structures is that humans work through articulating concepts whereas digital technologies require structures that can process these concepts in a computable form. Thus the special issue will promote our understanding of how the productivity of computers can be brought to bear on the human energy needed to run cities effectively. This would allow cities to focus their limited human assets on more creative, imaginative and innovative ways of delivering services by delegating as much as possible to the computer at lower cost but higher productivity. Online access, electronic sensors, wearable technologies or social media cannot meet this gap alone. Rather, computers have to take on more on the reasoning that presently resides in the human thinking of cities and their citizens – hence smart applications in smart cities.

The objective of this special issue is to provide a space to disseminate smart city applications that portray current experiences, lessons learned and future benefits of using technology for the support of local authorities or citizens and for the provision of more efficient public services.



Recommended Topics
Subjects of study may include, but are not limited to:
  • Energy management
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Healthcare and well-being
  • Waste and water management
  • Transport
  • Social services
  • Environmental services
  • Policy creation
  • Governance implementation plans


Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Smart Applications in Smart Cities on or before February 29, 2016. All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

Follow this link to submit a manuscript: http://www.igi-global.com/submission/submit-manuscript/



All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:
Ardavan Amini (Birmingham City University, UK)
Email: Ardavan.Amini@bcu.ac.uk
Luis Hernandez-Munoz (Birmingham City University, UK)
Email: Luis.Hernandez-Munoz@bcu.ac.uk
Guest Editors
International Journal of Conceptual Structures and Smart Applications (IJCSSA)

Special Issue On: Transforming Learning with Smart Technology

Submission Due Date
8/31/2017

Guest Editors
Susan Ferebee, Ph.D, University of Phoenix
Mansureh Kebritchi, Ph.D, University of Phoenix


Introduction
The theme for this special issue of International Journal of Conceptual Structures and Smart Applications is the influence, implication, and challenges of smart technology and applications in education. Typical e-learning is thought of as occurring on a computer, at a desk, in a web-based environment, but today’s smart applications, e-texts, and smart virtual learning environments offer much broader possibilities to students, instructors, and administrators. Smart learning spaces can be context aware, offer ubiquitous interaction and resources, allowing the learner to participate anywhere and anytime using supporting tools delivered in the correct format, at the correct time and place. Smart learning spaces can provide the means for adaptive education, helping ensure that meaningful learning occurs for each student. Smart learning environments support social, individual, and collaborative learning, provide continuous learning experiences, and provide personalized learning based on the learner’s abilities and needs.

Objective
Expanding smart technology in education can allow teachers to focus on creative ways to help students elaborate their learning, allowing smart apps, e-texts, and smart virtual learning environments to provide more of the core instruction. This special issue would provide a platform for sharing smart learning applications, smart learning environments, smart e-texts and how they are currently used, challenges in implementing smart learning, and future advantages of smart technology used to personalize learning for students at all levels.

Recommended Topics
Recommended topics include, but are not limited to smart technology and applications for:

-K-12
-Post-secondary
-Special needs learners
-Homeschooling
-Specific subjects (e.g., math, science, language arts)
-Student communication
-Improving student retention
-Improving learning outcomes
-Improving student engagement


Submission Procedure
Researchers, practitioners, scholars, doctoral faculty and candidates are all invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Transforming Learning with Smart Technology on or before August 31st, 2017. All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:
Dr. Susan Ferebee | Email: ferebees@gmail.com
Dr. Mansureh Kebritchi | Email: mansureh.kebritchi@phoenix.edu

Special Issue On: Programmed Death in Dynamic Systems: Natural, Artificial, and Social

Submission Due Date
9/30/2017

Guest Editors
Dr. Jeremy Horne, IAL CEO, Science Advisor and Curriculum Coordinator

Introduction
Much has been written (Varella and Maturana, for examples) concerning autopoiesis, or self-organization within systems, that which enables the system to self-organize and maintain its identity. This presentation focuses upon self-destruction and entropy, the state of complete disorganization, the logical opposite of autopoiesis. The interaction between self-organization and entropy occurs within putative closed and open systems, or viability in the context of mere homeostasis (self-maintaining) or adaptation. To a certain extent, we may tell the difference between system sustaining processes and processes that are leading to a system’s demise in terms of externally determined goal states, but attention should be given to a system’s ability to acquire a self-destructive goal state as part of its core (the same core allowing for autopoiesis). When this occurs, there appears a seeming paradox of the system’s tendency to be homeostatic or adaptive and drawing upon that core with the autodestructive element. Autodestructive elements already exist in systems, an example being the IL-18 T-cells in humans. The question is whether a process or mechanism, such as cell apoptosis (cell death) as an analogue programmed into systems, especially organic (artificially and naturally) systems. One may include societies as organic systems, as well. More controversial is social entropy in this species, such as it not having the collective wisdom to meet challenges posed by advanced technologies and the will not to destroy the environment necessary to sustain them, let alone commit suicide of the species, itself.

Objective
Autodestruction may exist as an abstraction, but one may want to pause and reflect upon any dynamic system, many of which are alleged to have assumed lives of their own, the Internet being a case in point. In the political philosophical arena, it may be asked whether societies, themselves as organic units have life cycles, the endpoint also being a form of apoptosis. Oriented more towards applications environments, one sees the emergence of technology under the rubric of “Smart Cities”, suggesting that the artifacts of social units (cities) may be “verbalized” by descriptive systems (the “Smart” Cities) that also may have their own lives, similar to the Internet. A major question is whether autodestruction exists here, as well. In summary, this special issue aims to address the question of system sustainability in terms of programmed self-destruction and its implication for systems and societies.

Recommended Topics
Programmed self-destruction (natural, artificial, and social)
The state of complete disorganization
Autodestructive elements that already exist in systems
Autodestruction as a counterpart to autopoiesis in dynamic systems
Social entropy
Societies as organic units
Cell apoptosis (cell death) programmed into systems
Artifacts of social units
Life cycles in mobile, ubiquitous, or embedded systems
Dynamic system adaptability against the backdrop of programmed system death
Homeostasis vs. adaptation in terms of viability
System sustaining processes and processes that are leading to a system’s demise
Emergence of technology under the rubric of "Smart Cities" and its political philosophical significance


Submission Procedure

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Programmed Death in Dynamic Systems: Natural, Artificial, and Social on or before September 30, 2017. All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.



Follow the submission link below to begin your contribution.

All submissions and inquiries should be directed to the attention of:
Dr. Jeremy Horne
Email: JHorne.IAL@gmail.com