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Mobile Handheld Devices

Copyright © 2009. 49 pages.
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DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch003
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MLA

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Mobile Handheld Devices." Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications. IGI Global, 2009. 46-94. Web. 19 Sep. 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch003

APA

Hu, W. (2009). Mobile Handheld Devices. In W. Hu (Ed.), Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications (pp. 46-94). Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch003

Chicago

Hu, Wen-Chen. "Mobile Handheld Devices." In Internet-Enabled Handheld Devices, Computing, and Programming: Mobile Commerce and Personal Data Applications, ed. Wen-Chen Hu, 46-94 (2009), accessed September 19, 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-59140-769-0.ch003

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Abstract

Mobile users interact with mobile commerce applications by using small wireless Internet-enabled devices, which come with several aliases such as handhelds, palms, PDAs, pocket PCs, and smartphones. To avoid any ambiguity, a general term, mobile handheld devices, is used in this book. A mobile handheld device is small enough to be held in one hand and is a general-purpose, programmable, battery-powered computer, but it is different from a desktop PC or notebook due to the following three special features: • Limited network bandwidth: This limitation prevents the display of most multimedia on a microbrowser. Though the Wi-Fi and 3G networks go some way toward addressing this problem, the wireless bandwidth is always far below the bandwidth of wired networks. • Small screen/body size: This feature restricts most handheld devices to using a stylus for input. • Mobility: The high mobility of handheld devices is an obvious feature that separates handheld devices from PCs. This feature also makes possible many new applications such as mobile recommendations that normally cannot be done by PCs. Short battery life and limited memory, processing power, and functionality are additional features that impose limitations on handheld devices, but these problems are gradually being solved as the technologies improve and new methods are constantly being introduced. Figure 3.1 shows a typical system structure for handheld devices, which includes six major components: (i) a mobile operating system, (ii) a mobile central processing unit, (iii) a microbrowser, (iv) input and output devices and methods, (v) memory and storage, and (vi) batteries. Brief descriptions of each of these components are given below, followed by a more detailed description in the main body of the chapter.
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Introduction

Mobile users interact with mobile commerce applications by using small wireless Internet-enabled devices, which come with several aliases such as handhelds, palms, PDAs, pocket PCs, and smartphones. To avoid any ambiguity, a general term, mobile handheld devices, is used in this book. A mobile handheld device is small enough to be held in one hand and is a general-purpose, programmable, battery-powered computer, but it is different from a desktop PC or notebook due to the following three special features:

  • Limited network bandwidth: This limitation prevents the display of most multimedia on a microbrowser. Though the Wi-Fi and 3G networks go some way toward addressing this problem, the wireless bandwidth is always far below the bandwidth of wired networks.

  • Small screen/body size: This feature restricts most handheld devices to using a stylus for input.

  • Mobility: The high mobility of handheld devices is an obvious feature that separates handheld devices from PCs. This feature also makes possible many new applications such as mobile recommendations that normally cannot be done by PCs.

Short battery life and limited memory, processing power, and functionality are additional features that impose limitations on handheld devices, but these problems are gradually being solved as the technologies improve and new methods are constantly being introduced. Figure 1 shows a typical system structure for handheld devices, which includes six major components: (i) a mobile operating system, (ii) a mobile central processing unit, (iii) a microbrowser, (iv) input and output devices and methods, (v) memory and storage, and (vi) batteries. Brief descriptions of each of these components are given below, followed by a more detailed description in the main body of the chapter.

Figure 1.

System structure of mobile handheld devices

  • 1.

    Mobile operating systems: These comprise the core software of handheld devices. Mobile operating systems are different from those in desktop computers as they include the following additional features: (i) power management to prolong the battery life, (ii) real-time capability for time-critical operations such as voice communication, and (iii) a wireless infrastructure for wireless communication.

  • 2.

    Mobile central processing units: Mobile CPUs are the core hardware of mobile handheld devices, and the performance and functionality of the devices are heavily dependent on the capabilities of the processors.

  • 3.

    Microbrowsers: Microbrowsers are Internet browsers specifically designed for use in mobile handheld devices. They differ from desktop browsers in several important ways, specifically the languages they use, security protocols, footprint, and smaller windows. Although this last feature, smaller windows, enables them to provide simplified interfaces, it also eliminates much of the desktop browser’s multimedia functionality, such as streaming -audio and -video support.

  • 4.

    Input and output devices and methods: There is only one major output device, the screen, but there are several popular input devices, in particular keyboards and touch screens/writing areas, that require the use of a stylus.

  • 5.

    Memory and storage: Three types of memory are usually employed by handheld devices: (i) random access memory, (ii) read-only memory, and (iii) flash memory.

  • 6.

    Batteries: Rechargeable Lithium Ion batteries are most commonly used in handheld devices.

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Complete Chapter List

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Chapter 1
Wen-Chen Hu
With the introduction of the World Wide Web, electronic commerce revolutionized traditional commerce, boosting sales and facilitating exchanges of... Sample PDF
Fundamentals of Mobile Commerce Systems
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Chapter 2
Wen-Chen Hu
Commerce, the exchange or buying and selling of commodities on a large scale involving transportation of goods from place to place, benefits from... Sample PDF
Mobile Commerce Applications
$37.50
Chapter 3
Wen-Chen Hu
Mobile users interact with mobile commerce applications by using small wireless Internet-enabled devices, which come with several aliases such as... Sample PDF
Mobile Handheld Devices
$37.50
Chapter 4
Wen-Chen Hu
Without ways to conduct secure commercial information exchange and safe electronic financial transactions over mobile networks, neither service... Sample PDF
Essential Mobile-Commerce Technology
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Chapter 5
Wen-Chen Hu
As handheld computing is a fairly new computing area, there is as yet no generally accepted formal definition. For the purposes of this book... Sample PDF
Mobile World Wide Web Content
$37.50
Chapter 6
Wen-Chen Hu
Wireless application protocol (WAP) (Open Mobile Alliance, 2003) is a suite of network protocols that specifies ways of sending data across the... Sample PDF
WML (Wireless Markup Language)
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Chapter 7
Advanced WML  (pages 180-206)
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter VI discusses the creation of static web pages, which have a fixed content at all times. In order to change static web pages to dynamic ones... Sample PDF
Advanced WML
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Chapter 8
WMLScript  (pages 207-228)
Wen-Chen Hu
WML is a markup language used for text formatting and displaying (Open Mobile Alliance, 2001). However, the functions of a markup language are... Sample PDF
WMLScript
$37.50
Chapter 9
Wen-Chen Hu
Numerous server-side handheld applications are available for devices. Some popular applications include: • Instant messages, which require service... Sample PDF
Database-Driven Mobile Web Content Construction
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Chapter 10
Wen-Chen Hu
There are two kinds of handheld computing and programming, namely client- and server- side handheld computing and programming. The most popular... Sample PDF
Client-Side Handheld Computing and Programming
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Chapter 11
Wen-Chen Hu
Most client-side handheld programming uses either Java or C/C++. This chapter introduces Java ME (previously known as J2ME), which is a version of... Sample PDF
Java ME (Java Platform, Micro Edition) Programming
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Chapter 12
Wen-Chen Hu
Chapter XI introduced the basics of Java ME programming. This chapter will build on this, focusing on advanced Java ME programming. The following... Sample PDF
Advanced Java ME Programming
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Chapter 13
Palm OS Programming  (pages 333-350)
Wen-Chen Hu
Programming for Palm devices is not a trivial task and it is especially hard for beginners starting their first assignment. This chapter is not... Sample PDF
Palm OS Programming
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Chapter 14
Wen-Chen Hu
The introduction to Palm OS programming given in the previous chapter provided an overview of its structure and basic concepts. This chapter... Sample PDF
Advanced Palm OS Programming
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