Theory and Practice of Expectation Maximization (EM) Algorithm

Theory and Practice of Expectation Maximization (EM) Algorithm

Chandan K. Reddy (Wayne State University, USA) and Bala Rajaratnam (Stanford University, USA)
Copyright: © 2009 |Pages: 8
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-010-3.ch300
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Abstract

In the field of statistical data mining, the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is one of the most popular methods used for solving parameter estimation problems in the maximum likelihood (ML) framework. Compared to traditional methods such as steepest descent, conjugate gradient, or Newton-Raphson, which are often too complicated to use in solving these problems, EM has become a popular method because it takes advantage of some problem specific properties (Xu et al., 1996). The EM algorithm converges to the local maximum of the log-likelihood function under very general conditions (Demspter et al., 1977; Redner et al., 1984). Efficiently maximizing the likelihood by augmenting it with latent variables and guarantees of convergence are some of the important hallmarks of the EM algorithm. EM based methods have been applied successfully to solve a wide range of problems that arise in fields of pattern recognition, clustering, information retrieval, computer vision, bioinformatics (Reddy et al., 2006; Carson et al., 2002; Nigam et al., 2000), etc. Given an initial set of parameters, the EM algorithm can be implemented to compute parameter estimates that locally maximize the likelihood function of the data. In spite of its strong theoretical foundations, its wide applicability and important usage in solving some real-world problems, the standard EM algorithm suffers from certain fundamental drawbacks when used in practical settings. Some of the main difficulties of using the EM algorithm on a general log-likelihood surface are as follows (Reddy et al., 2008): • EM algorithm for mixture modeling converges to a local maximum of the log-likelihood function very quickly. • There are many other promising local optimal solutions in the close vicinity of the solutions obtained from the methods that provide good initial guesses of the solution. • Model selection criterion usually assumes that the global optimal solution of the log-likelihood function can be obtained. However, achieving this is computationally intractable. • Some regions in the search space do not contain any promising solutions. The promising and nonpromising regions co-exist and it becomes challenging to avoid wasting computational resources to search in non-promising regions. Of all the concerns mentioned above, the fact that most of the local maxima are not distributed uniformly makes it important to develop algorithms that not only help in avoiding some inefficient search over the lowlikelihood regions but also emphasize the importance of exploring promising subspaces more thoroughly (Zhang et al, 2004). This subspace search will also be useful for making the solution less sensitive to the initial set of parameters. In this chapter, we will discuss the theoretical aspects of the EM algorithm and demonstrate its use in obtaining the optimal estimates of the parameters for mixture models. We will also discuss some of the practical concerns of using the EM algorithm and present a few results on the performance of various algorithms that try to address these problems.
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Introduction

In the field of statistical data mining, the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm is one of the most popular methods used for solving parameter estimation problems in the maximum likelihood (ML) framework. Compared to traditional methods such as steepest descent, conjugate gradient, or Newton-Raphson, which are often too complicated to use in solving these problems, EM has become a popular method because it takes advantage of some problem specific properties (Xu et al., 1996). The EM algorithm converges to the local maximum of the log-likelihood function under very general conditions (Demspter et al., 1977; Redner et al., 1984). Efficiently maximizing the likelihood by augmenting it with latent variables and guarantees of convergence are some of the important hallmarks of the EM algorithm.

EM based methods have been applied successfully to solve a wide range of problems that arise in fields of pattern recognition, clustering, information retrieval, computer vision, bioinformatics (Reddy et al., 2006; Carson et al., 2002; Nigam et al., 2000), etc. Given an initial set of parameters, the EM algorithm can be implemented to compute parameter estimates that locally maximize the likelihood function of the data. In spite of its strong theoretical foundations, its wide applicability and important usage in solving some real-world problems, the standard EM algorithm suffers from certain fundamental drawbacks when used in practical settings. Some of the main difficulties of using the EM algorithm on a general log-likelihood surface are as follows (Reddy et al., 2008):

  • EM algorithm for mixture modeling converges to a local maximum of the log-likelihood function very quickly.

  • There are many other promising local optimal solutions in the close vicinity of the solutions obtained from the methods that provide good initial guesses of the solution.

  • Model selection criterion usually assumes that the global optimal solution of the log-likelihood function can be obtained. However, achieving this is computationally intractable.

  • Some regions in the search space do not contain any promising solutions. The promising and non-promising regions co-exist and it becomes challenging to avoid wasting computational resources to search in non-promising regions.

Of all the concerns mentioned above, the fact that most of the local maxima are not distributed uniformly makes it important to develop algorithms that not only help in avoiding some inefficient search over the low-likelihood regions but also emphasize the importance of exploring promising subspaces more thoroughly (Zhang et al, 2004). This subspace search will also be useful for making the solution less sensitive to the initial set of parameters. In this chapter, we will discuss the theoretical aspects of the EM algorithm and demonstrate its use in obtaining the optimal estimates of the parameters for mixture models. We will also discuss some of the practical concerns of using the EM algorithm and present a few results on the performance of various algorithms that try to address these problems.

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Background

Because of its greedy nature, the EM algorithm converges to a local maximum on the log-likelihood surface. Hence, the final solution will be very sensitive to the given initial set of parameters. This local maxima problem (popularly known as the initialization problem) is one of the well studied issues in the context of the EM algorithm. Several algorithms have been proposed in the literature to try and solve this issue (Reddy, 2007).

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