Computer Mediated Negotiations and Deception

Computer Mediated Negotiations and Deception

Gabriel A. Giordano (University of Navarra, Spain), Jason Stoner (The Ohio University, USA), Robyn L. Brouer (Hofstra University, USA) and Joey F. George (The Florida State University, USA)
Copyright: © 2008 |Pages: 10
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-59904-863-5.ch017
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Abstract

With the increasing use of technology in the workplace, more organizational communication is electronic and more group tasks are conducted in computer mediated settings than ever before. This includes negotiations, which are an important part of most organizations. Researchers are beginning to realize that the increased use of computer mediated communication in negotiations can change an individuals’ behavior, including their negotiation style and ability to detect deception. However, there is limited research in this area, so many originations are likely not aware of the problems associated with deception in computer mediated negotiations. This chapter reviews past research, a current study, and future research directions related to computer mediated negotiations and deception.

Key Terms in this Chapter

Negotiation: A form of decision-making where two or more independent parties converse with one another in an effort to resolve their opposing interests and make joint decisions (Pruitt, 1981)

Deception: A message knowingly transmitted by an individual to foster a false belief or conclusion in others (Buller & Burgoon, 1996).

Media Richness: The ability of communication media to transmit rich messages. Richness is characterized as the amount of feedback, social cues, language variety, and personal focus that is conveyed to a communicative partner (Daft et al., 1987).

Distributed Negotiating: Distributive tactics and solutions used to procure concessions from the other party (Pruitt, 1981).

Social Presence: A feeling of realness in a communication setting that is the result of cues and the perceived distance between communicators (Short et al., 1976).

Negotiation: A form of decision-making where two or more independent parties converse with one another in an effort to resolve their opposing interests and make joint decisions (Pruitt, 1981)

Deception: A message knowingly transmitted by an individual to foster a false belief or conclusion in others (Buller & Burgoon, 1996).

Social Presence: A feeling of realness in a communication setting that is the result of cues and the perceived distance between communicators (Short et al., 1976).

Integrative Negotiating: Integrative tactics and solutions involve tradeoffs and are used to fulfill the interests of all the negotiators (Pruitt, 1981).

Distributed Negotiating: Distributive tactics and solutions used to procure concessions from the other party (Pruitt, 1981).

Integrative Negotiating: Integrative tactics and solutions involve tradeoffs and are used to fulfill the interests of all the negotiators (Pruitt, 1981).

Forcing Negotiating: Imposing one’s will on others using threats and bluffs, persuasive arguments, and positional commitments (Van de Vliert, 1997).

Media Richness: The ability of communication media to transmit rich messages. Richness is characterized as the amount of feedback, social cues, language variety, and personal focus that is conveyed to a communicative partner (Daft et al., 1987).

Forcing Negotiating: Imposing one’s will on others using threats and bluffs, persuasive arguments, and positional commitments (Van de Vliert, 1997).

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