Interface-Based Differences in Online Decision Making

Interface-Based Differences in Online Decision Making

David Mazursky (The Hebrew University, Jerusalem)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-014-1.ch104
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Abstract

In recent years the online Web site interface format was found to have significant effects on attitudes toward the store and people’s actual experiences when visiting Web sites. In attempting to gain a competitive advantage, online site managers are adopting state-of-the-art technologies, aiming to create a unique experience and to capture more of people’s attention during their navigation. Using 3D technology interface gives site designers the opportunity to create a total experience. They are generally used in two formats. The first, more common format, is adopted for displaying 3D objects within a 2D interface site, and characterizes today’s numerous Web site stores (Nantel, 2004). The second format, which is still rare, is for creation of virtual reality environments (Figure 1). Converting a 2D interface site to a 3D interface site requires both technological investment, and gaining user confidence in the new environment. Therefore, site managers must weigh the pros and cons of each method before performing the conversion. The current analysis compares 2D and 3D interfaces, pointing out the advantages and shortcomings of each format.
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Introduction

In recent years the online Web site interface format was found to have significant effects on attitudes toward the store and people’s actual experiences when visiting Web sites. In attempting to gain a competitive advantage, online site managers are adopting state-of-the-art technologies, aiming to create a unique experience and to capture more of people’s attention during their navigation. Using 3D technology interface gives site designers the opportunity to create a total experience. They are generally used in two formats. The first, more common format, is adopted for displaying 3D objects within a 2D interface site, and characterizes today’s numerous Web site stores (Nantel, 2004). The second format, which is still rare, is for creation of virtual reality environments (Figure 1).

Figure 1.

3D online store demonstration

Converting a 2D interface site to a 3D interface site requires both technological investment, and gaining user confidence in the new environment. Therefore, site managers must weigh the pros and cons of each method before performing the conversion.

The current analysis compares 2D and 3D interfaces, pointing out the advantages and shortcomings of each format.

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Background

Definition of 3D and 2D Interfaces

2D interface is flat design that is not intended to offer exploration. Usually, 2D interfaces are used for presenting static information. In contrast, 3D interface is geared toward immersing the user in a situation. The 3D interface has emerged as a technology that approaches the users toward a realistic computer environment (Li, Daugherty, & Biocca, 2001; Mazursky & Vinitzky, 2005). In 3D interface, users can experience products virtually by examining and manipulating the visual images.

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2D And 3D Different Interface Properties Create Different Surfer Experience

Within the many opportunities that new interfaces offer, cyber technology appears to comprise two main properties: interactivity and vividness. These major properties are frequently inversely related (Shih, 1998), such that allocation of resources to improve one aspect of the interface detracts from, or at least does not improve, the quality of the other. (Table 1)

Table 1.
Typologies of interfaces characteristics
2D Interface3D interface
InteractivityHighLow
VividnessLowHigh
TelepresenceLowHigh
BricolageLowHigh

Key Terms in this Chapter

Telepresence: Reflects the degree of the consumer’s perception of him/herself as being physically located in a mediating computerized environment (Schloerb, 1995).

Vividness: The degree of clarity of the information the consumer receives in the virtual world or the profusion of representation of the mediating environment to the senses (Steuer, 1992).

Interactivity: The ability of the communication system “to answer” the consumer, almost as if a real conversation were taking place (Rogers, 1986).

Bricolage: The manipulation of objects in the immediate environment for the development and assimilation of ideas (Turkle, 1995).

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