Shopping Cart | Login | Register | Language: English

Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective

Release Date: February, 2012. Copyright © 2012. 649 pages.
Select a Format:
Hardcover
$144.00
List Price: $180.00
Current Promotions:
20% Online Bookstore Discount*
In Stock. Have it as soon as Oct. 24 with express shipping*.
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-4666-0116-1, ISBN13: 9781466601161, ISBN10: 1466601167, EISBN13: 9781466601178
Cite Book

MLA

Manoharan, Aroon, and Marc Holzer. "Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective." IGI Global, 2012. 1-649. Web. 21 Oct. 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-0116-1

APA

Manoharan, A., & Holzer, M. (2012). Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective (pp. 1-649). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-0116-1

Chicago

Manoharan, Aroon, and Marc Holzer. "Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective." 1-649 (2012), accessed October 21, 2014. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-0116-1

Export Reference

Mendeley
Favorite
Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective
Access on Platform
Browse by Subject
Top

Description

As governments across the world increasingly adopt information and communication technology to improve their efficiency and effectiveness, they are gradually providing opportunities for citizen participation and engagement online. The use of Internet technologies raises the possibility for large-scale e-democracy and enhances the degree and quality of public participation in government.

Active Citizen Participation in E-Government: A Global Perspective focuses on the issues and challenges involving adoption and implementation of online civic engagement initiatives globally and will serve as a valuable guide to governments in their efforts to enable active citizen participation. This book details the efforts of governments and public agencies in providing proper channels for engaging their citizens and presents a wide range of research on approaches undertaken by governments across the world in facilitating active citizen participation online.

Top

Table of Contents and List of Contributors

Search this Book: Reset
Table of Contents
Preface
Aroon Manoharan, Marc Holzer
Chapter 1
Étienne Charbonneau, Younhee Kim
Over the past decade, performance information has been widely available to citizens along with the expansion of e-government, which has magnified... Sample PDF
Reconfiguring Performance Information Linking with Accountability: Reporting and Internal Management
$37.50
Chapter 2
Deborah Mohammed-Spigner, Daniel Bromberg, Marc Fudge, Neil Coleman
This chapter presents research on transparency in county government. It is argued that through the use of information and communication... Sample PDF
E-Gov and Transparency in NJ Counties: Providing Information to Citizens
$37.50
Chapter 3
Sherri Greenberg, Angela Newell
Today, people regularly debate the meaning of the term transparency relative to government. President Obama has made transparency a prominent issue... Sample PDF
Transparency Issues in E-Governance and Civic Engagement
$37.50
Chapter 4
Laura Wesley
This chapter presents a flexible framework for measuring efficiency, effectiveness, and citizen satisfaction with public sector websites. The... Sample PDF
Measuring and Improving Information-Based Government Websites: A Suggested Framework
$37.50
Chapter 5
Taewoo Nam, Djoko Sigit Sayogo
This chapter investigates how the democratic divide has been established due to socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, by analyzing the data... Sample PDF
Online Political Participation in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: Examining the Democratic Divide
$37.50
Chapter 6
Jakob Svensson
A classic question within studies of governance concerns what appears to be a paradox of being free and governed at the same time. In this chapter... Sample PDF
Power and Identity among Citizens in Networked Societies: Towards a Critical Study of Cultural E-Governance
$37.50
Chapter 7
Dimitrios Zissis, Dimitrios Lekkas, Argyris Arnellos
Information and Communication Technologies are being evaluated as an efficient and effective way to modernize the electoral process. These... Sample PDF
A Systems Theory Approach to Electronic Voting Complexity
$37.50
Chapter 8
Erkki Patokorpi, Sami Leppimäki, Franck Tétard
Digital games have, or can be made to have, certain characteristics that make them suitable for education, communication, and the promotion of civic... Sample PDF
Educational and Democratic Potential of Digital Games in e-Government
$37.50
Chapter 9
Françoise Simon
Currently, citizen-users show a noticeable preference for in-person communication, over Internet-based delivery channels. As a result, governmental... Sample PDF
Managing Interactional Performance in E-Government
$37.50
Chapter 10
Sonia Lara, Concepción Naval
The latest report from the Pew Research Center (2010) shows that 93% of American teenagers and young adults use the Internet, and that 73% of them... Sample PDF
Social Networks, Civic Participation, and Young People: A Literature Review and Summary of the Educational Challenges
$37.50
Chapter 11
Ubaldo Comite
Procurement reform, launched in the last few years, offers prospects of consistent and permanent expense saving. The urgency to reduce expenses and... Sample PDF
Innovative Processes and Managerial Effectiveness of e-Procurement in Healthcare
$37.50
Chapter 12
Pietro Previtali
The public procurement of goods and services is a strategic activity for governments for at least three reasons: a) it has a relevant economic... Sample PDF
European Public E-Procurement: The Italian Experience
$37.50
Chapter 13
Lucienne Abrahams, Mark Burke, Lauri Elliott, Warren Hero
Gauteng, South Africa’s economic center, has a history of social exclusion by virtue of differentiated access to employment, income, assets, and... Sample PDF
Civic Engagement and E-Governance in Gauteng: Grounds for universal Household Broadband Internet Service
$37.50
Chapter 14
Vako Mbako, Kelvin Joseph Bwalya, Tanya Du Plessis, Chris Rensleigh
Countries the world over have drawn e-Government interventions placing much emphasis on erecting affluent ICT infrastructures, institutional, legal... Sample PDF
Implications of e-Government in Botswana in the Realm of e-Participation: Case of Francistown
$37.50
Chapter 15
Jian-Chuan Zhang, Ying Qin
Few prior studies have addressed the political impact of the Internet on civic engagement in rural areas. This preliminary study aims to explore the... Sample PDF
Impact of Internet Use on Civic Engagement in Chinese Rural Areas: A Preliminary Research
$37.50
Chapter 16
Malathi Subramanian
In India, the administrative system, with roots in the colonial past, is largely perceived as unresponsive and insensitive to the citizens’ needs... Sample PDF
Rural E-Governance through the “Panchayati Raj” Institutions in India: Prospects and Challenges
$37.50
Chapter 17
Kavita Karan
E-Governance, inclusive of e-democracy, e-government, and e-business, has the power to improve processes, connect citizens, and build interactions... Sample PDF
E-Engaging India: E-Democracy Strategies for Empowerment and Civic Participation
$37.50
Chapter 18
Mohammad Habibur Rahman, Patrick Kim Cheng Low, Mohammad Nabil Almunawar, Fadzliwati Mohiddin, Sik-Liong Ang
Policy reform initiative in e-Government and other public management areas such as good governance has been momentous and visible in many societies... Sample PDF
E-Government Policy Implementation in Brunei: Lessons Learnt from Singapore
$37.50
Chapter 19
Djoko Sigit Sayogo, Taewoo Nam
This study explores the impact of online communicative structures in local government Web disclosure on democratic legitimacy, after the... Sample PDF
Elucidating Online Structure for Democratic Legitimacy: Case of Local Government Online Structure in Java-Indonesia
$37.50
Chapter 20
Alicia Schatteman, Deborah Mohammed-Spigner, George Poluse
This study is based on a global survey of municipal websites conducted by the E-Governance Institute at Rutgers University New Jersey and the Global... Sample PDF
Citizen Participation through Municipal Websites: A Global Scorecard
$37.50
Chapter 21
Francesco Molinari, Mateja Kunstelj, Ljupco Todorovski
In this chapter, the authors present and discuss the results of the IDEAL-EU project, in which three European Regions - i.e. Tuscany, Catalonia, and... Sample PDF
Stepwise e-Participation: Good Practice from the Regional Level in Europe
$37.50
Chapter 22
Eleni-Revekka Staiou, Dimitris Gouscos
The objective of this chapter is to highlight and discuss the concepts of e-governance, open governance, and civic engagement enabled by... Sample PDF
Open Governance, Civic Engagement, and New Digital Media
$37.50
Chapter 23
Salem Al Shair Al Suwaidi, Ibrahim Ahmed Elbadawi
As government organizations increasingly recognize the fast growth and expanding influence of social media tools such as social networking sites... Sample PDF
Social Media Corporate Policies for Government Organizations: Lessons Learnt from the United Arab Emirates
$37.50
Chapter 24
Charlene M. L. Roach
The Trinidad and Tobago (TT) Pilot Portal site, also known as TT Connect provides a gateway to access the services of the 22 TT government... Sample PDF
TT Connect: The Gateway to Enhanced Service Delivery
$37.50
Chapter 25
Vildan Mahmutoglu
Media is an electronic circle that can create spaces for deliberation, interaction, or participation. However, media in the global age is also... Sample PDF
A Glimmer of Hope for Mass Media in a Liberal Democracy: istanbulrumazinligi.com
$37.50
Chapter 26
Ewa Krzatala-Jaworska
The French State has been investing in the development of the information society, which has become an important frame of reference for local... Sample PDF
Debate on E-Debate: Between Acceptance and Refusal
$37.50
Chapter 27
Hisham M. Alsaghier, Rahim Hussain
Although trust aspects have been investigated in e-commerce context, the e-government field is still significantly lacking from empirical studies... Sample PDF
Conceptualization of Trust in the e-Government Context: A Qualitative Analysis
$37.50
Top

Reviews and Testimonials

This book presents a wide range of research on approaches undertaken by governments across the world in facilitating active citizen participation online. The chapters also highlight the unique determinants and challenges surrounding its implementation in different global regions. Focusing on the issues and challenges involving adoption and implementation of online civic engagement initiatives globally, the book should serve as a valuable guide to governments in their efforts to enable active citizen participation.

– Aroon Manoharan (Kent State University, USA)Marc Holzer (Rutgers - The State University of New Jersey, USA)

In sum, the book offers a useful collection of cases and perspectives on citizen e-participation in e-government, broadly conceived, taken from different parts of the world, which is undoubtedly its main strength. Among other aspects, readers will find in these essays ample evidence on best practices in e-government, for instance on how to use performance information to promote government accountability, how ICT can be used by municipalities to increase transparency, or on how to measure citizen satisfaction with information in public sector websites.[...] All these challenging issues make it a useful book for all those working in the broad field of e-government and interested to learn more about innovative experiences that might act somehow as references for their own e-planning projects.

– Carlos Nunes Silva, International Journal of E-Planning Research (IJEPR)

The emphasis in Active Citizen Participation is on empirical research, describing practical methods of improving interaction and identifying problems with the technology, the projects and the attitudes of the target citizenry.

– David Mason, Victoria University of Wellington, Online Information Review, Vol. 37, No. 1
Top

Topics Covered

  • E-Governance and Citizen Participation
  • E-Governance and Citizen Satisfaction
  • E-Governance and Citizen Trust
  • E-Governance and Democracy
  • E-Governance and Digital Divide
  • E-Governance and Performance Reporting
  • Introduction to E-Governance
  • Performance Measurement of E-Governance
  • Privacy Issues in E-Governance
  • Transparency and Accountability Issues under E-Governance
Top

Preface

As governments across the world increasingly adopt information and communication technology to improve their efficiency and effectiveness, they are gradually providing opportunities for citizen participation and engagement online. The use of Internet technologies raises the possibility for large-scale e-democracy and enhances the degree and quality of public participation in government. Initially, e-participation was largely passive, with mostly one-way communication and information dissemination. Nowadays, online participation is highlighted by two-way communication and the active participation of citizens, along with the increasing accessibility of computers and the ever-increasing prevalence of social media. In light of these various possibilities for citizens to actively participate in governance and decision-making, this book details the efforts of governments and public agencies in providing proper channels for engaging their citizens.

This book presents a wide range of research on approaches undertaken by governments across the world in facilitating active citizen participation online. The chapters also highlight the unique determinants and challenges surrounding its implementation in different global regions. Focusing on the issues and challenges involving adoption and implementation of online civic engagement initiatives globally, the book should serve as a valuable guide to governments in their efforts to enable active citizen participation.

In Chapter 1, Reconfiguring Performance Information Linking with Accountability: Reporting and Internal Management, Étienne Charbonneau and Younhee Kim suggest innovative approaches to present complicated performance information to citizens. The chapter reviews various cases to understand the link between performance measurement and performance information in order to promote communication between citizens and government.  According to the authors, performance reporting should be constructed in modernized, innovative, and user-focused ways to stimulate the use of performance information by external stakeholders, which can promote government accountability. In Chapter 2, E-Gov and Transparency in NJ Counties: Providing Information to Citizens, Deborah Mohammed-Spigner, Daniel Bromberg, Marc Fudge and Neil Coleman examine the levels of transparency on New Jersey county government websites, and addresses specific issues related to access to information and service delivery. The research demonstrates that counties are utilizing information and communication technologies to increase transparency in a range of modes. However, the use of such technologies continues to remain in its infancy at the county-government level. In Chapter 3, Transparency Issues in E-Governance and Civic Engagement, Sherri Greenberg and Angela Newell discuss the definition of transparency related to e-governance and the implementation of transparency initiatives. Transparency is important in the transition from e-government to e-governance and President Obama has made transparency a prominent issue in the federal government with his directive to use online resources to promote transparency. This chapter outlines the necessary political, policy, and technology and transparency issues in e-governance, along with recommendations for best practices in policy development and implementation. In Chapter 4, Measuring and Improving Information-based Government Websites: A Suggested Framework, Laura Wesley introduces a framework for measuring efficiency, effectiveness and citizen satisfaction with public sector websites. The framework uses research methods that measure the extent to which online information advances organizational objectives, reaches its target audience and meets users' expectations for service and quality. In Chapter 5, Online Political Participation in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election: Examining the Democratic Divide, Taewoo Nam and Djoko Sigit Sayogo examine how the democratic divide (the gap in political activities via the Internet) is linked to socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, based on the data from the Pew Research Center’s survey conducted during the campaign season of the 2008 U.S. presidential election. The study compares five different types of online political activity - communication, mobilization, information consumption, information production, and involvement in social networking websites. 

In Chapter 6, Power and Identity among Citizens in Networked Societies: Towards a Critical Study of Cultural E-Governance, Jakob Svensson discusses the issues of political participation, citizenship practices and power. Based on social theory and transdisciplinarity, the chapter examines how people enter into citizenship through political participation online and the factors governing these processes. In Chapter 7, A Systems Theory Approach to Electronic Voting Complexity, Dimitrios Zissis, Dimitrios Lekkas, and Argyris Arnellos contribute to the existing body of knowledge on electronic voting, based on Soft System Methodology (SSM). Electronic voting is often identified as a 'soft' ill-structured human activity system, and soft systems thinking is applied to resolve complex issues and provide a clearer perspective of related interdependencies. In Chapter 8, Educational and Democratic Potential of Digital Games in E-Government, Erkki Patokorpi, Sami Leppimäki and Franck Tétard discuss the potential of digital games for education, communication and the promotion of civic skills in e-government. According to the authors, learning by games promotes the understanding of complex social issues and their mutual relationships, and consequently, learning by playing serious games is best understood as reasoned practical action in a virtual world. Presenting a social and cultural rationale for the use of games by citizens in terms of social capital, the chapter discusses worldwide examples of existing game applications for e-government. In Chapter 9, Managing Interactional Performance in E-Government, Françoise Simon discusses the issue of interactional performance in public e-service delivery, based on a conceptual framework of media choice and the theory of perceived justice. The chapter examines the interplay of service complexity, media richness and social cues on individual media preferences. Additionally, it discusses key factors that lead citizen-users to the perception of a sense of equity through electronic communication. 

In Chapter 10, Social Networks, Civic Participation and Young People: A Literature Review and Summary of the Educational Challenges, Sonia Lara and Concepción Naval examine the contribution of social networks to citizen participation. The key questions discussed in the chapter are - How does the use of social networks affect civic behaviour and attitudes among citizens? Does such use foster real civic participation or, in contrast, does it lead to isolation from the real world as a result of engagement in online activities? Also, are there generic, quantitative and/or qualitative differences between offline and online social and civic participation? In Chapter 11, Innovative Processes and Managerial Effectiveness of E-Procurement in Healthcare, Ubaldo Comite discusses the functioning of new models of e-procurement and explores its potential in achieving efficiency, based on the reorganization of the acquiring procedures of goods and services. In Chapter 12, European Public E-Procurement: The Italian Experience, Pietro Previtali discusses the role of e-procurement and presents various European central procurement models from the public sector. Based on an e-transaction survey in the Italian Central Procurement Department, the chapter discusses the category of goods and services compliant with e-procurement tools, along with the implications of the legislative framework for e-procurement transactions. 

In Chapter 13, Civic Engagement and E-Governance in Gauteng: Grounds for Universal Household Broadband Internet Service, Lucienne Abrahams, Mark Burke, Lauri Elliott and Warren Hero present insights into the state of e-development in Gauteng, South Africa. The achievement of universal suffrage in 1994 created the foundations for greater civic engagement. However, as social interaction and societal governance become increasingly electronically mediated, a large proportion of the population is excluded from these new forms of on-net interaction. This chapter argues that policies that push universal household broadband service can contribute to reducing social exclusion through creating the foundation for households to operate as units of production and overcome economic deprivation, thus laying a stronger basis for civic engagement. In Chapter 14, Implications of E-Government in Botswana in the Realm of E-Particpation: Case of Francistown, Mbako Vako, Bwalya Kelvin Joseph, Tanya Du Plessis and Chris Rensleigh present the intervention strategies towards robust e-government development in Botswana where e-government is still at the very initial stages. Many of the e-government strategies being planned in Botswana have often inadequately considered the e-participation component and this is negatively impacting the overall anticipated value prepositions for e-government implementation. Based on an exploratory and empirical study of Francistown and surrounding rural areas, the chapter presents a critical analysis of the state of e-government preparedness and the current status of e-government adoption in Botswana.

In Chapter 15, Impact of Internet Use on Civic Engagement in Chinese Rural Areas: A Preliminary Research, Jian-Chuan Zhang and Ying Qin explore the relationship between Internet usage and civic engagement in rural China. Based on the surveys implemented by the China Internet Network Information Center (CNNIC), the authors find that Internet does enhance the level of civic engagement among rural users and has the potential to enable active engagement in public affairs in the future. In Chapter 16, Rural E-Governance through the ‘Panchayat Raj’ Institutions in India: Prospects and Challenges, Malathi Subramanian examines the role of local self-government Institutions (Panchayats) in rural e-governance in India. The Panchayats are particularly helpful in simplifying civic governance, by making government more democratic, inclusive, and more accessible to the citizens at the local village level. In Chapter 17, E-Engaging India: E-Democracy Strategies for Empowerment and Civic Participation, Kavita Karan examines the e-governance and e-democracy strategies, and new media technologies used by political parties, industrial corporations and other organizations in India. The chapter particularly examines the recent elections that witnessed a surge in the use of new Internet technologies, social networking and mobile technologies, along with the traditional forms of electioneering. 

In Chapter 18, E-Government Policy Implementation in Brunei: Lessons Learnt from Singapore, Mohammad Habibur Rahman, Patrick Kim Cheng Low, Mohammad Nabil Almunawar, Fadzliwati Mohiddin and Sik-Liong Ang examine e-government strategies in Brunei in the light of policy success in Singapore. Based on their empirical research in these two South-East Asian nations, this chapter highlights the factors that have enabled e-government policies to be successfully implemented in Singapore and propose potential success ingredients for the implementation of similar strategies in Brunei. In Chapter 19, Elucidating Online Structure for Democratic Legitimacy: Case of Local Government Online Structure in Java-Indonesia, Djoko Sigit Sayogo and Taewoo Nam explore the online communicative structures among local governments in Java, Indonesia. Based on an analysis of local government websites, the study reveals that the levels of democratized Internet mediated human interactions through local government online structures are restricted. The questions specifically addressed in this study are: to what extent would e-government implementation change the communication structure between local government and the citizens of Indonesia? Are citizens able to generate opinions and attitudes that will affirm or challenge the affairs of state? Is the local government able to promote democratic legitimacy in Indonesia through the design, control, and filter of their online structure?

In Chapter 20, Citizen Participation Through Municipal Websites: A Global Scorecard, Alicia Schatteman, Deborah Mohammed-Spigner and George Poluse introduce a model to explain why some countries provide better online citizen participation opportunities than others. Based on the global study of municipal websites, the chapter specifically addresses two primary questions: 1. What are the opportunities for online participation in the most populous cities globally? 2. What factors are associated with opportunities for online citizen participation through municipal websites? In Chapter 21, Stepwise E-Participation: Good Practice from the Regional Level in Europe, Francesco Molinari, Mateja Kunstelj and Ljupco Todorovski discuss the results of the IDEAL-EU project, in which three European Regions - iTuscany, Catalonia and Poitou-Charentes - have involved citizens (and particularly young people) in discussing and deliberating on the priorities of the new climate change agenda of the European Parliament. These deliberations are supported by two distinct ICT instruments - a Social Networking Platform and a pan-European Virtual Town Meeting. 
 
In Chapter 22, Open Governance, Civic Engagement and New Digital Media, Eleni-Revekka Staiou and Dimitris Gouscos highlight and discuss the concepts of e-governance, open governance and civic engagement enabled by technologies such as Web 2.0, social media and user-generated content. The focus of discussion is placed on common founding premises and adoption factors that are reproduced at multiple levels, from that of the underlying technology up to end services and interaction patterns. A number of governance initiatives and services are used as working examples, with a view to providing readers with an improved understanding of technological principles and functional capabilities that can attract citizen participation and encourage civic engagement. In Chapter 23, Social Media Corporate Policies for Government Organizations: Lessons Learnt from the United Arab Emirates, Al Shair, Salem and Ibrahim Elbadawi, present the key lessons learnt from the process of formulating a government-wide social media policy in the United Arab Emirates. The chapter discusses the main barriers to the successful adoption of social media along with providing recommendations for future research. 

In Chapter 24, TT Connect – The Gateway to Enhanced Service Delivery, Charlene M. L. Roach examines The Trinidad and Tobago (TT) Pilot Portal site, also known as ttconnect, which provides a gateway to access the services of the twenty-two TT government ministries. The chapter explains that in using the portal design, TT’s government is attempting to shift to a new paradigm in its service delivery, improving public outreach and citizens’ responsiveness.  The chapter also reviews TT government’s macro policy called Vision 2020 and Fastforward, the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) strategy, which are being used as policy instruments to enable TT to reach developed nation status by the year 2020. In Chapter 25, A Glimmer of Hope in Mass Media in Liberal Democracy: istanbulrumazinligi.com, Vildan Mahmutoglu examines a website launched by the Greek minority in Istanbul - istanbulrumazinligi.com. The chapter examines how a minority group can find a place in national public sphere? Particulary, how does the new media provide solutions for the problems of national integrated public sphere through opening new spaces?  The findings will be analyzed by the terms of engagement to democracy, public sphere, minority culture and e-democracy, and e-deliberation. In Chapter 26, Debate on E-Debate: Between Acceptance and Refusal, Ewa Krzatala-Jaworska examines the factors that influence the acceptance or refusal of e-participation tools by local government stakeholders. Based on a case study of a French Municipality of 50,000 inhabitants, the findings show that the attitude towards e-participation by local councilors depends largely on the degree of control they have over the vision of local democracy. The hypothesis of this study is that the decision of local officials to involve citizens in the policy process via the Internet depends not only on the rational balance between gains and costs, but also on the beliefs of the local councilors. In Chapter 27, Conceptualization of Trust in the e-Government Context: A Qualitative Analysis, Hisham Alsaghier and Rahim Hussain provide an in-depth understanding of the citizens’ perception of e-government adoption based on a qualitative approach using focus groups. The study identifies the critical factors that affect citizens’ trust in e-government and provide a comprehensive guide to governments on how to improve citizens’ trust and enhance their engagement in the e-government initiatives.

Top

Author(s)/Editor(s) Biography

Aroon Manoharan is an Assistant Professor of Public Administration at the Department of Political Science, Kent State University, USA. His research focuses on e-governance, performance measurement and reporting, organization management, and comparative administration. He received his Ph.D. from the School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University-Newark and MPA from Kansas State University. As Associate Director of the E-Governance Institute at Rutgers-Newark, he directed major initiatives including the Digital Governance in Municipalities Worldwide Survey 2007, which evaluated the e-governance performance at the municipal level globally. He also directed the U.S. States and Municipalities E-Governance Survey in 2008.
Marc Holzer, Dean of the Rutgers School of Public Affairs and Administration, is a leading expert in performance measurement, public management, and e-governance. He is the founder and director of the National Center for Public Performance, a research and public service organization devoted to improving performance in the public sector. He also developed the E-Governance Institute, created to explore the on-going impact of the Internet and other information technologies on the productivity and performance of the public sector, and how e-government fosters new and deeper citizen involvement within the governing process. His recent publications include Performance Measurement; Citizen-Driven Government Performance; the Public Productivity Handbook; Restoring Trust in Government: The Potential of Digital Citizen Participation, and Building Good Governance: Reforms in Seoul. He has published well over one hundred books, monographs, chapters, and articles. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration and of the World Academy of Productivity Science.
Top

Editorial Board

  • Dr. Ari-Veikko Anttiroiko, University of Tampere, Finland  
  • Dr. Daniel Bromberg, Western Carolina University, USA
  • Professor Donald J. Calista, Marist College, School of Management, USA
  • Dr. Tony J. Carrizales, Marist College, School of Management, USA
  • Dr. Yu-Che Chen, Northern Illinois University, USA
  • Dr. Amit Das, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar 
  • Mr. Bwalya Kelvin Joseph, University of Botswana, Botswana
  • Dr. Chan-Gon Kim, Seoul Metropolitan Government, Seoul, South Korea
  • Prof. Dr. Patrick Kim Cheng Low, University of South Australia/Universiti Brunei Darussalam
  • Dr. Seung-Yong Rho, Seoul Women's University, South Korea
  • Dr. Alan R. Shark, D.P.A., CAE, Public Technology Institute, Rutgers University School of Public Affairs & Administration, USA
  • Dr. Genie Stowers, San Francisco State University, USA
  • Dr. Hua Xu, Auburn University – Montgomery, USA
  • Dr. Kaifeng Yang, Florida State University, USA
  • Dr. Wenxuan Yu, Nanyang Technological University Singapore, Singapore 
  • Dr. Younhee Kim, East Carolina University, USA