Computing Curriculum Analysis and Development

Computing Curriculum Analysis and Development

Anthony Scime (State University of New York College, USA)
DOI: 10.4018/978-1-60566-026-4.ch108
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Abstract

Information technology (IT) is an umbrella term that encompasses disciplines dealing with the computer and its functions. These disciplines originated from interests in using the computer to solve problems, the theory of computation, and the development of the computer and its components. Professionals from around the world with similar interests in IT came together and formed international professional organizations. The professional organizations span the disciplines of computer engineering (CE), computer science (CS), software engineering (SE), computer information systems (CIS), management information systems (MIS), and information technology (IT) (Freeman & Aspray, 1999). Note that information technology is both an umbrella term and a specific discipline under that umbrella. These organizations exist to promote their profession and one method of promotion is through education. So, these professional organizations defined bodies of knowledge around the computer, which have been formalized and shaped as model curriculums. The organizations hope that colleges and universities will educate students in the IT disciplines to become knowledgeable professionals. Because of the common interest in computing, there is a basic theory and a common technical core that exists among the model curricula (Denning, 1999; Tucker et al., 1991). Nevertheless each of the model curricula emphasizes a different perspective of IT. Each fills a different role in providing IT professionals. It falls upon the colleges and universities to select and modify the corresponding curriculum model to fit their needs.
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Background

Currently, there are a number of model curricula for computing (Figure 1). A Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula created by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE-CS) developed Computing Curricula 2001 (CC 2001). This model focuses on programs in theoretical and applied computer science with various areas of emphasis in all areas of computing including computer engineering (CE), the engineering of computer hardware, and computer science (CS), the theory and design of hardware and software (Computing Curricula, 2001).

Figure 1.

IT professional organizations and curriculum models

The field of information systems (IS) can be divided into the management of information systems (MIS), the engineering of computer information systems (CIS) and the use of existing commercial software applications to solve organizational problems or information technology (IT). The Information Resource Management Association (IRMA) and the Data Administration Managers Association (DAMA) have a curriculum model for MIS known as the Information Resource Management (IRM) model. It takes a management of data approach to information systems (Cohen, 2000). For a strong accounting and management MIS orientation, the Information Systems Auditing and Control Foundation has developed an interdisciplinary curriculum known as the Information Systems Auditing at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels (ISA) model (ISACF, 1998).

IS 2002 (Information Systems, 2002) is a model curriculum developed through the joint efforts of the ACM, the Association for Information Systems (AIS), and the Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP). This curriculum model focuses on information systems development as well as on management (Gorgone, Davis, Valacich, Topi, Feinstein, & Longenecker, 2002). The Information Systems Centric Curriculum (ISCC ’99) model was developed by a task force that included members from academe and industry. It is oriented to large-scale system design and implementation. The focus is on the construction of the tools necessary for information management (Lidtke, Stokes, Haines, & Mulder, 1999).

Key Terms in this Chapter

Computer Science (CS): Hardware and software theory and design.

Organizational and End User Information Systems (OEIS): Model developed by the OSRA is aimed at IT support of end-users (Office Systems Research Association, 1996).

Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Model: Model developed at SEI that follows an engineering approach of design first. The model suggests specialization in a specific domain (Bagert, Hilburn, Hislop, Lutz, McCracken, & Mangal, 1999).

Management Information Systems (MIS): The management of information systems and data including management of the design, development, implementation, and maintenance of information systems. Sometimes referred to as information systems.

Information Systems Auditing (ISA) at the Undergraduate and Graduate Levels: Model developed by the ISACF Task Force for Development of Model Curricula. It is an interdisciplinary approach with a strong accounting and management orientation. (ISACF, 1998).

Computer Engineering?(CE): The engineering of computer hardware.

Information Systems Centric Curriculum (ISCC ’99): Model developed by a task force that included members from academe and industry. It is oriented toward large-scale system design and implementation as opposed to automata theory and programming. The focus is on the construction of the tools necessary for information management (Lidtke, Stokes, Haines, & Mulder, 1999).

Computing Curricula 2001 (CC 2001): Developed by the Joint Task Force on Computing Curricula created by the ACM and the IEEE-CS. This model focuses on programs in theoretical and applied computer science (Computing Curricula, 2001 AU10: The in-text citation "Computing Curricula, 2001" is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

Information Resource Management (IRM): Curriculum model 2000 of the IRMA and the DAMA focuses particularly on the disciples of information resource management and management information systems. It takes a management of data approach (Cohen, 2000).

Information Systems 2002 (IS 2002): Model curriculum developed by the efforts of the ACM, AIS, and AITP. This curriculum model focuses on information systems development and management (Gorgone, Davis, Valacich, Topi, Feinstein, & Longenecker, 2002).

IT Curriculum Proposal: Being developed by SIGSITE, the curriculum is oriented toward the use of computing applications to solve organizational problems (IT Curriculum Proposal – Draft, 2002 AU12: The in-text citation "IT Curriculum Proposal – Draft, 2002" is not in the reference list. Please correct the citation, add the reference to the list, or delete the citation. ).

This work was previously published in Encyclopedia of Information Science and Technology: edited by M. Khosrow-Pour, pp. 508-512, copyright 2005 by Information Science Reference, formerly known as Idea Group Reference (an imprint of IGI Global).

Information Systems (IS): Use data to create information and knowledge to assist in operational, management, and strategic organizational decision-making. It is also an umbrella term for computer information systems, management information systems and information technology.

Computer Information Systems (CIS): Concerns information systems with an emphasis on information as an enterprise resource, and its design, development, implementation, and maintenance of information systems. Sometimes referred to as information systems.

Information technology (IT): Uses existing commercial software applications to solve organizational problems. Sometimes refer to as information systems. It is also the umbrella term for all the disciplines involved with the computer.

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