Establishing Key Performance Indicators to Measure the Benefit of Introducing the Facilities Manager at an Early Stage in the Building Information Modeling Process

Establishing Key Performance Indicators to Measure the Benefit of Introducing the Facilities Manager at an Early Stage in the Building Information Modeling Process

Barry McAuley (School of Real Estate and Economics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland), Alan Hore (School of Real Estate and Economics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland) and Roger West (Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland)
Copyright: © 2013 |Pages: 14
DOI: 10.4018/ij3dim.2013100104
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Abstract

The Facilities Manager occupies a unique position within the lifecycle of a building asset, as he/she is one of the only Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) and Facilities Management (FM) professionals who is in a position to view the product of the entire design and build process and is responsible for the operational phase which incurs approximately five times the initial capital cost. Despite the potential benefits that the Facilities Manager offers, this profession still does not command the recognition it deserves within the AEC/FM sector. This is beginning to change through the introduction of Building Information Modelling (BIM). In order for the BIM process to be maximised it is imperative that the Facilities Manager plays a much more important role within the design and construction process. Despite this, at present the role of the Facilities Manager within this process is still uncertain with no set Key Performance Indicators (KPI) or role designation being specified to date. This paper outlines how the Facilities Manager can play a pivotal role in the BIM process and, in particular, will aim to establish the basis for a number of KPIs by Facility Managers which will in turn lead to a more robust Lean FM practice.
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Background

In ever changing financial landscapes it is imperative that the construction sector reacts and participates in a new digital age and utilities the available tools at its disposal. One of the most interesting technologies to have emerged within the construction sector in recent years has come through the Building Information Modelling (BIM) process.

Building Information Modelling

BIM is effectively a more productive method of managing the construction process with a long term view towards reducing life cycle costs of the associated assets within the project. The construction industry, as indicated by Azhar (2011), has long sought techniques to decrease project cost, increase productivity and quality, and reduce project delivery time. BIM offers the potential to achieve these objectives as it stimulates the construction project in a virtual environment. BIM is a tool as detailed by Alvarado and Lacouture (2010) that can foster project integration on different levels within the Architecture, Engineering, Construction, and Facility Management (AEC/FM) sector, because it can facilitate information exchange, access to real time information, and information gathering among project members. BIM is poised to revolutionise the construction industry because of its promise to radically improve collaboration among the wide-ranging expertise needed to design and construct a building and to increase efficiency (Kent & Gerber, 2010).

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